What Else Can They Do With Rock #1? City of Rocks National Reserve

City of Rocks National Reserve, rock climbing, scenery, hiking

One Of The Less Well Known NPS Sites

When we took our retirement trip in 2010 to Utah we were amazed at how many varieties and shapes of rock we saw. The phrase “what else can they do with rock?” became a common question. We are continuing to find ourselves saying this as we travel through other parts of the west. Our last stop in Idaho for this year is just one example.

We left Boise and headed south and east to the small town of Almo, Idaho and Castle Rock State Park which is adjacent to City of Rocks National Reserve. We’ve been to a national preserve but didn’t know the definition of a reserve. It was explained to us that the National Park Service oversees the area administratively and participates in decisions but the Idaho State Parks supply manpower and management.

A Panorama Of The Area

A Panorama Of The Area

When we arrived at Castle Rock SP we headed for our reserved site but ran into a new glitch. The site was still occupied. Steve checked and there was no car and no occupants. So we pulled off the road and went in search of the Camp Host. She offered us another site in the equestrian portion of the campground but if we really wanted the reserved site the park would arrange to tow the other trailer away. The alternative site was lovely so we took that one. We never did find out why the people hadn’t vacated on time. Our Camp Host, Dottie, was a very interesting woman. She is a solo RVer and rock climber who was one of the first woman blackjack dealers in Las Vegas. Each winter she goes to Mexico where she and two other woman (a retired professor from Columbia University and a native New Zealander)  have built an animal rescue and spay facility called Fiona Animal Rescue of Hidalgo to deal with the severe overpopulation and mistreatment of domestic animals in the area. To read more about this worthy effort go to http://www.potreropups.org.

fall color

Fall Color At City Of Rocks

City of Rocks National Reserve is one of the newer National Park sites offering stunning granite formations, overlapping biological regions for 750 plants and animals, world class rock climbing, 22 miles of hiking trails, photography sites and one of the best preserved locations on the California Trail. The park offers training in basic rock climbing with their Rock Climbing Ranger. Nearby is the Sawtooth National Forest with more beautiful scenery, lakes and campgrounds. We spent the first two days driving and walking among the spires and formations. Dogs are allowed on the trails so Opal enjoyed seeking out trails of pioneer dogs.

Replicas Of Pioneer Wagons

Replicas Of Pioneer Wagons

 

 

A "Cityscape" In Granite

A “Cityscape” In Granite

 

 

 

 

 

 

architecture, homestead

1890s Homestead Ruins

 

 

 

rock climbing

Rock Climbers Love This Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Man In The Rock

Old Man In The Rock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rock formations

Steve Standing By Rock Formation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latter in the week we had an opportunity to go on a two hour tour with the park archeologist, Kristin. The tour is listed in the park brochure but must be scheduled ahead. She is an excellent guide and provided many stories about the history of the California Trail and people who had left their signatures on Camp Rock and Register Rock. The park is working on a booklet about these people. Hopefully it will be available next year. Most of the signatures were written in axle grease but a few were carved into the rock. We learned that axle grease had come in many colors; red, green and even yellow so that at one time these rocks were very colorful. Now time and weather has made them uniform and in some cases difficult to read. Some 200,000 settlers passed through City of Rocks along the California Trail making this the largest emigrant movement in the world. One of the best known formations is The Twin Sisters because it could be easily spotted by the pioneers at a distance.

A Homesteader's Signature

A Homesteader’s Signature

One Of The Women Who Passed This Way

One Of The Women Who Passed This Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Traveler's Sketch

A Traveler’s Sketch

The Twin Sisters

The Twin Sisters

Today the town of Almo remains a very small ranching community where the general store still serves as the post office just as it has since the 1890s. If you come here, plan on bringing all your groceries with you as the nearest large grocery is an hour plus away. For non-campers there is a resort and motel and a few local restaurants.

Idaho, old photo, general store

Old Photo Of Almo General Store

Our drive into the Sawtooth National Forest turned up a few more interesting rock formations and great Fall scenery. We found two NFS campgrounds with good accessibility and suitable for our trailer so we added them to our GPS database. Even though they are dry camp areas we would enjoy a few days of fishing and hiking here. There is a wonderful scenic overlook at the top of Cache Peak. The Raft River below and the peak were named by Peter Skeen Ogden, a fur trader for the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1826. The river was so named because beavers had it dammed and it could only be crossed by raft. Cache Peak got it’s name because it served as a landmark for trappers as to where they had cached their pelts. There is one overlook where you can see the location of a WWII aircraft training flight wreck. If you look closely you can still see a tire lying there.

fall foliage, Sawtooth NF

Sawtooth NF Early Fall Foliage

lichen

Painted With Lichen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photography

A Landscape That Looks Like A Painting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rainbow in rock

A Rainbow Of Color In Rock

 

 

Can You See The Elephant?

Can You See The Elephant?

 

View From Cache Peak

View From Cache Peak

On A Clear Day You Can See Forever

On A Clear Day You Can See Forever

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two other National Park sites were within an hour’s drive; Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument and Minidoka National Historic Site. When we put them into the GPS we didn’t realize they shared the same Visitor Center. so when we looked at the directions from one location to the other the GPS said “Drive six feet”. Who says machines don’t have a sense of humor. The Hagerman Fossil Beds are an extensive area of fossils along the Snake River Plain near Twin Falls, Idaho. The most famous are those of a herd of the earliest known horses called the Hagerman horse (Equus Simpicidens). They are more closely related to the Grevy’s zebra of Kenya and Ethiopia than the modern horse. Other fossils found here include mastodon and saber-toothed tigers. The small visitor center has good displays however the actual fossil sites are closed to the public. You can also see original wagon ruts of the California Trail passing close to the fossil beds.

fossil

Meet The Hagerman Horse

 

 

Snake River Canyon From Twin Falls Bridge

Snake River Canyon From Twin Falls Bridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Minidoka NHS was established in 2001 and tells the story about internment of Japanese Americans during WWII. I found the story and site to be moving, disturbing and educational. To realize that an entire segment of our population could be rounded up, deprived of their Civil Rights and freedom and imprisoned is shocking. It just shows what fear can do. Racial prejustice was already known to the immigrant Japanese (Issei) because as resident aliens they were prevented from owning land or obtaining citizenship. Their American born children (Nisei) were citizens. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor hostility increased and all people of Japanese ancestry were treated as spies and saboteurs. The impetus for internment was Executive Order 9066  in February 1942 which gave military commanders the power to exclude any persons from designated areas to secure national defense objectives. While the order could have been applied to anyone it was primarily used to remove 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry from the Pacific coast. Within five months ten relocation centers were built with 7,100 people being relocated to Minidoka. Here they faced barbed wire fences, armed guards and restricted movement. Faced with poorly constructed barracks and sanitation they had to endure temperatures from -21 to 104. However this was a resourceful group who went on to create gardens, publish a newspaper and create musical groups. Minidoka became almost a self sustaining community. By the time the camp closed in 1945 the residents had cleared and cultivated 950 acres of land. A questionnaire was used to determine loyal internees from dissenters. If they answered No to willingness to serve in the US Armed Forces in combat and to foreswear allegiance to Japan they were shipped to Tule Lake Camp in California. Minidoka became the camp for loyal internees. Minidoka had the largest number of men volunteering for military service. The 442nd combat unit served in France and Italy and had two Medal of Honor recipients. When the camp closed the newly reclaimed land was sold by lottery. Most of the former camp land remains privately owned today. A few structures from the original camp remain hopefully to keep this from ever happening again.

One Of The Remaining Structures At Minidoka NHS

One Of The Remaining Structures At Minidoka NHS

Minidoka Camp 1942-1945

Minidoka Camp 1942-1945

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Replica Of Guard Tower

Replica Of Guard Tower

Turning The Desert Into A Garden

Turning The Desert Into A Garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 442nd In Europe

The 442nd In Europe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With this we leave Idaho for this trip and head for Utah. There is so much more to see we will definitely be back!

 

A Jump Down To Boise

Our next stop on this quick tour through Idaho was the capital, Boise, about 6 hours from Lewiston. Once again we disregarded the suggested route from the GPS as it was over seven hours. We headed back through Spaulding and turned south on US 95. Very quickly we realized the GPS had been trying to keep us off steep grades. We were committed now (or maybe that should read we should be committed) to drive what is called White Bird Hill,. It was named after a Nez Pearce chief and a battle in 1877. The present road took ten years to build and opened in 1975 with an elevation change of 2700 feet and average grade of 7% in seven miles. The pass is the dividing line between the Salmon river and the Camas Prairie. An older road by the same name still exists as a National Backcountry Byway. there are a few You Tube videos showing the drive. While not particularly good clips they will give you an idea of the road. Now imagine you have a 16,000 pound trailer pushing you along so you are using your lowest gear to slow down, a heavily loaded truck is in front of you going 15 mph and you can’t pass, runaway truck ramp signs are all over the place and the GPS says the road has a 48 foot limit and you are 54 feet!  We made it down without incident. Now we know why all the other RVs we saw were going up, not down.  I was nervous and my hands were sweaty as I hoped our brakes or engine wouldn’t overheat.  Later I asked Steve if he was nervous. No. I knew we were fine. I married a man with nerves of steel!

Lucky Peak Lake, Idaho, Boise

Lucky Peak Lake

US 95 followed the Salmon River through the Sawtooth Mountains. We’d heard how beautiful this area was and it didn’t disappoint us. All along we made notes of where to stay and made plans to return taking a week or more to travel this route. We arrived in late afternoon to Lucky Peak Reservoir CG just northeast of Boise. This is a COE park but with no facilities. When they say a 35 foot limit they mean it. We just fit. We had to park the truck elsewhere.  It is a pack in-pack out park for trash but we did find a dumpster at a day use state park just down the road.

Our time in Boise would be three nights and split between errands and sightseeing. We had to return to a Chevy dealer due to a containing problem caused by the side mirror repair. The dealer in Montana had to remove the plastic panel on the door and didn’t get it back in place properly. It would catch when you tried to open or close the door. With brute force you could force the door to work but we were afraid either the door wouldn’t work in an emergency or the plastic panel would break. The dealer in Montana agreed to pay for repairs and we located a dealer in Boise. Once the repair was made we needed to do shopping, laundry and haircuts. Right next to the Chevy dealer we found a fresh fruit stand, beauty shop, butcher and bakery. We decided to have lunch at the bakery. During lunch Steve said Your hair is getting lighter.” I replied “No. It’s turning gray.” Remember this when you read the end of this post. With all of our chores done we had a day to play.

Peregrine Fund Logo

Peregrine Fund Logo

Looking at area points of interest we noted The Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. This turned out to be the World Headquarters for The Peregrine Fund. They have birds from all over the world who cannot be released into the wild on display for educational use. It was very hard to photograph the birds through double wire cages but a few photos are worth posting here. The Center is a primary breeding location for the California Condor Release program. In fact, the birds we saw in the wild in 2010 at Navajo Bridge in Arizona most likely came from this facility. A volunteer gave a short talk after a film and brought out Wilbur the western screech owl. Then you could go with here for a tour of the archives. I’m glad we went as this was the best part of the visit. We learned that falconry used for hunting came from the middle east and is still popular there. Beautiful wildlife art and photography is on display. The star of the visit though is a display of desert Arab life with falconry, a gift from the family of Sheikh Zayed a lifelong falconer and conservationist. To read more about the archives go to http://www.peregrinefund.org/heritage-wing.

bald eagle

American Bald Eagle

Batelur Eagle, birds of prey, Peregrine Fund

Batelur Eagle

Gyrfalcon

Gyrfalcon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Aplomado Falcon

Northern Aplomado Falcon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orange Breasted Falcon

Orange Breasted Falcon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ornate Hawk Eagle

Ornate Hawk Eagle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

owl

Wilbur, The Western Screech Owl

tour, birds

Displays At The Peregrine Fund Archives

falconry

Falconry In The Middle East

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basque Restaurant In Boise

Basque Restaurant In Boise

We didn’t have time to explore Boise but learned that this area has a strong Basque heritage. So we dined at a Basque restaurant called Bar Gernika which was a Diners, Drive-ins and Dives establishment too. Gernika was immortalized by the Picasso painting of the massacre during the Spanish Civil War. Neither of us had ever had Basque food. We started out with a cheese and sausage plate. There was enough for six people so we took home the extra and made two more appetizers from it. Our main dishes were equally good and filling. This is a very small place with about eight tables and bar seating inside supplemented with patio dining in good weather.

Basque culture

Mural Depicting Basque Culture

Now I’ll turn the blog over to Steve.

“If all your friends were jumping off a bridge, would you have to do it too?” What mother hasn’t said that to her kids? In my case, it was a very specific bridge in the question, the Brooklyn Bridge, my mother had in mind, but I’m sure any bridge would do. I must have heard it hundreds of times between the ages of eight and eighteen!

Twice in the past week that question came to mind, and the answer was a big fat YES! 

While out for a ride in the Boise area, we decided to check out camping facilities for future reference at Centennial Park. There is an old bridge there, probably originally a railroad bridge, now used by pedestrians. It’s at least fifty feet over the Snake River. There were two guys with ropes and other paraphernalia out in the middle of the bridge, a third was on the shore looking up at them. I was walking out there to take a few pictures while Chari was taking a few shots from the shoreline.

“What are you guys doing?” Are you going to bungee jump?”

“No, we’re setting up a swing.” 

One fellow explained the procedure… tying one end of the rope to the bridge, setting it to just short of the drop to the water, attaching the other end to a harness worn around his waist, walking out along the edge until the rope is taut, and jumping off. What you have is a swing, except unlike a playground swing that starts from ground level and you swing up, this starts from the top! 

“Have you done this often?”

“Just heard about it yesterday.”

“But you have to be careful the rope isn’t too long, or all you do is splash into the water, as I just found out!” the other one, the one preparing the rope, commented. (Apparently, this one had some experience!)

“Do you mind if I take a few pictures?” I said, wondering if I was about to record a suicide jump.

“Not at all… go ahead.”

bridge swing

Swinging From The Bridge

“WOWEEEEE!!!”

A friend on shore was taking pictures with his telephone. 

Chari didn’t know what was going on until she saw this guy swinging over the water.

Is This A Good Idea?

Is This A Good Idea?

I had walked down to the river’s edge with Opal to take pictures and to look at some of the boulders deposited when ancient Bonneville Lake caused a massive flood. I heard this whoop, turned and saw someone dangling above the water. Not to miss out, I left to join Steve on the bridge.

Snake River Near Centennial Park

Snake River Near Centennial Park

As the second jumper was getting ready we talked. He was from Florida visiting his brother. He had never done anything like this before. He made his way across the bride framework until the rope grew taut. I was positioned to take pictures through the fence. I could feel his tension, his indecision and his fear. then he stepped off….

That's A Hell Of A Step!

That’s A Hell Of A Step!

YOW!!!!!

YOW!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YOW!!!! echoed off the banks.

We watched the third jumper from shore then exchanged e-mail addresses promising to send photos which we did.

A couple of days later, we were driving through Twin Falls, Idaho and stopped at the bridge over the Snake River Canyon, not far from the spot where Evel Knievil made his motorcycle jump. We had been told it was an impressive sight, and not to miss stopping at the scenic overlook. The bridge was about four-hundred feet over the water. While we were there, first one, then another, a third, and finally a fourth jumped off the bridge! No ropes! But, they were wearing parachutes, and we managed to get a few shots of them gliding down to the far shore. 

“Yeah, Mom. Maybe I would!”

On the morning we were to leave I was walking Opal near the tent sites. A mother and her daughter who I’m guessing was about three were walking to the latrine. In that clear voice child’s voice that carries a long way I heard “Oh look, it’s a grandma.” Well, sometimes there is no denying the truth. I was the only other person around. I couldn’t help but laugh much to the mother’s relief. Kids, you’ve got to love them for their honesty!

A Skip Over To The Snake River Area

On to Lewiston, Idaho at the western edge of Idaho where the Snake River divides it from Washington state. Here the Clearwater River meets with the Snake River. We’d planned only two nights here and when we saw the beautiful Hells Gate State Park we wished we’d planned a few days more. Our trip over was uneventful until just before reaching Lewiston. We had ignored the route the GPS gave us as it routed us through Washington and added over an hour to the trip. When we reached the mountain pass north of Lewiston we understood. Having no choice we started down the seven mile 6% grade using our lowest gear. A tense period but we landed unharmed. Little did we know that more challenging hills awaited!

Idaho, river, landscape

The Clearwater River Valley

Rolling Hills Of Northwest Idaho

Rolling Hills Of Northwest Idaho

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

historic trails

Crossing Of Nez Pearce Trail And Lewis And Clark Trail

Big Hole NB

Action At Big Hole NB

Nez Pearce, American Indian, history

Flight Path Of The Nez Pearce

 

 

Our primary reason for coming here was to visit the Nez Pearce National Historic Site. We’d been to Big Hole National Battlefield while in Montana. This area of Washington and Idaho had been the traditional homeland of the Nez Pearce but after gold was discovered miners and settlers flooded the area following the philosophy of Manifest Destiny. Previous treaties were revoked and gradually land granted to them shrunk and shrunk. In 1877 some renegades sought revenge and killed settlers. The Army responded and “the war no one wanted” was on. Chief Joseph led his people on a long, long march through Idaho and Montana trying to avoid further conflict. The Battle of Big Hole on August 9-10, 1877 where both soldiers (31) and Nez Pearce (90) were killed is a sad reminder of the clash of cultures. The Nez Pearce continued their flight hoping to reach Canada but were stopped just shy of the border. After capture the leaders were incarcerated in Oklahoma. They finally returned to the homeland after five years. The entire Nez Pearce Trail has 38 historic stops spread over four states. One we found earlier near Lemhi Pass shows where the Nez Pearce Trail crosses the Lewis and Clark Trail. Lewis and Clark met and traded with the Nez Pearce. The museum at Nez Pearce NHP has many interesting exhibits. One that caught our eye was the only remaining silk ribbon from one of the Peace medal carried by the Corps of Discovery given by Lewis to Chief Cut Nose. Also in the museum were several photographs, paintings and drawings of Nez Pearce life and tribal members. One of the rangers, a current member of the Nez Pearce, showed us two photos of her family members. (To see detail in pictures or maps just click on picture to bring to full screen.)

Manifest Destiny, history,

Philosophy Of Manifest Destiny

Quote From General Howard, Army General At Battle Of Big Hole

Quote From General Howard, Army General At Battle Of Big Hole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chief Joseph, Nez Pearce

Quote From Chief Joseph

painting, art, Lewis and Clark

Painting In Nez Pearce NHP Showing Lewis And Clark With Nez Pearce

Silk Ribbon From Lewis and Clark Peace Medal

Silk Ribbon From Lewis and Clark Peace Medal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relative Of Ranger At Nez Pearce NHP

Relative Of Ranger At Nez Pearce NHP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't You Just Love This Face?

Don’t You Just Love This Face?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So Serious And So Young

So Serious And So Young

Following our visit to Nez Pearce NHP we did what we do so often just driving backroads to see what we can find. Besides the beautiful scenery shown above we found this “dead bug” with a tree growing through it. Then we found wild plum trees just loaded with ripe fruit. There were yellow ones, red ones and purple ones. After sampling a few we picked a quart bag full of yellow plums. They were soooo sweet! We had them in our salads for four nights and wished we’d had gallon bags with us.

VW Bug, photography

Bugs Live On Forever

We made one more stop at Dworshak Dam on the Clearwater River. I’d seen announcements for volunteer positions for this site and wanted to check it out. We spoke with current volunteers and the head ranger about volunteering here in the future. Before leaving we viewed one of several movies they have about the area. This film was about the last log run on the Clearwater River before the dam was built in the mid 70s. Talk about cold, wet and hard work! The volunteer position looks very interesting combining Visitor Center work and leading tours of the Dam. Right now Steve doesn’t want to commit to more than three months and this requires four and a half months service. So we’ll put it in the to be consider pile. Whether as volunteers or just on our own we will definitely be back.

A Hop Over To Coeur d’Alene

Sorry for the delay in posting but our travels through Idaho, Utah and Colorado have put us in poor cell areas much of the time. When we did have good signal, it seemed we were also very busy being out and about. Hopefully we will now begin catching up. With our readers, patience is always a virtue! Thanks for sticking with us.

We hated to leave Glacier NP but after eighteen days of dry camping we were both looking forward to having hookups and long showers. On our way out we stopped in Whitefish, Montana to have the smashed side view mirror replaced. It came to just under our insurance deductible…Ka-ching! On to Coeur d’Alene in the Idaho panhandle.

Google Earth, Glacier NP, Coeur d'Alene, Farragut SP

Glacier NP to Coeur d’Alene

While we’ve been in eastern Idaho three times, neither of us had been in other parts of the state. I’d picked a state park at the southern end of Lake Coeur d’Alene called Heyburn. Reservations were made on Reserve America for a drive through site 55 feet long with water and electric. When we arrived, we had an unpleasant surprise. Yes, it was a drive through. Yes, it was long enough. However, the turn to get in was too sharp and on either side were big trees. The curve of the drive through was also too sharp for a large trailer. Steve tried to back in but there was a large rock just where he needed to put the truck so the angle of the trailer was right. If he backed in where the truck would fit, the trailer wheels were on a downhill slope. After six tries Steve said ” Let’s cancel reservations and go to Walmart.” We hadn’t filled our tank with water since we thought we’d have services plus we needed to dump. We located the dump site. Also set up with a sharp turn and narrow for a large trailer. I took a deep breath and hoped we’d make it through without any damage. We did. There was a Walmart close to where we needed to take our generators for repair the next day. We joined about ten other RVs, rented a Redbox movie and spent the night.

One good outcome of it all was finding a Diners, Drive-ins and Dives place called Capone’s. The original restaurant was in downtown Coeur d’Alene. Now there are three sites. We enjoyed our individual pizzas very much. ” I was raised in New York and haven’t found good pizza very many places. I told Chari, if we lived here, we’d eat at Capone’s a lot just like we did at Hawthorne’s our favorite pizza place in Charlotte.) “

The next day Steve ran our generators down to a Honda repair shop while Chari looked for another place to stay. We thought Farragut SP about 20 miles north sounded good but based on our experience we wanted to check it out before making reservations. First we needed to see about the slow leak we had in a trailer tire. Bad news there. The leak was a small puncture in the tire sidewall. Plus the spare tire was down to secondary rubber and by law the technician couldn’t put that on. So we bought two new tires. Ka-ching!

On to Farragut SP which is on beautiful Lake Pend Orielle (pronounced Pon Der A). We checked on availability and they had two sites left that would accommodate us. This is a lovely park with paved sites, water and electric hookups and gray water disposal drains throughout the camping loops. We were home! We’d been lucky to get a site as the coming weekend was their annual celebration for anyone who had served at Farragut Naval Training station during WWII. Prior to being a state park this area had been a major Navy basic training facility for recruits from the western states. Steve had an uncle who might have been one of the 293,000 + men who trained here. After setting up we just relaxed with a drink and dinner by a campfire.

Old Mission State Park, Idaho

Old Mission State Park

The following day we checked to see what time the generators would be ready. They’d run into some problems but thought the repairs would be completed by late that afternoon. My stack of brochures came in handy for some sightseeing ideas. We headed for another state park called Old Mission State Park which has the oldest building in Idaho. It is a National Historic Landmark. The Coeur d’Alene Indian tribe sought out Catholic priests who they heard had “powerful medicine” by sending representatives to St. Louis, Father DeSmet was the first to respond but was followed by others in the mid 1800s. The church that stands today was built by Indian labor using the wattle and daub method and did not use any nails. Features such as the handcut tin chandelier feature the creativity and artistry of the builders. Next door is a parish house furnished as it was in the early 1900s. Like many building the church went through a period of decline and was almost torn down before the state assumed ownership and two restorations were done. There is also a wonderful museum exhibit at the Visitor Center which is worth the additional $5 to view.

Front Of Old Mission

Front Of Old Mission

church, American Indian, mission

Church Interior With Handmade Chandelier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

architecture, National Historic Landmark

Ceiling Detail At Old Mission SP

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parrish House Office

Parrish House Office

 

 

 

 

Parish House Sanctuary

Parish House Sanctuary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then we took a scenic drive around Lake Coeur d’Alene and along the White Pine Scenic Byway. We looked at a National Forest Campground for future visits. A few sites are workable but Farragut SP would be our first choice. We also noted locations of some kayak pit-ins. By then it was time to pick up the generators. They were still working on them when we arrived. We talked to the mechanic as he finished up and learned of a local restaurant called The Porch which is known for its gumbo. It was late and we were hungry. Sounded good. First we had to pay for the generators…another $500! So much for paying off the credit card this month. We never would have found the restaurant on our own. Definitely one of the “locals go here” spots. The gumbo was very spicy but good. We’d come back any time we visit.

The Porch Restaurant

The Porch Restaurant

We gave ourselves an “at home” day which is something we rarely do unless the weather is bad. We had been on the go for three weeks and our energy was lagging. With our “batteries” recharged we headed to the park museum called The Brig. Normally the museum is closed after Labor Day but it was open for the veterans reunion. Within months of the Pearl Harbor attack and the USA’s entrance into WWII new bases were built quickly. One interesting fact was that Farragut was built at the same time as the San Diego Naval Base. Architectural plans were accidentally switched so that the California base was built with pitched roofs and the Idaho base was built with flat roofs. Bet the recruits had fun shoveling snow off of those roofs! The museum provides information on the home front during the war, recruitment and training and impact on the community.

museum, Idaho

Seaman Statue At The Brig Museum

Navy, WWII

Museum Is Housed In The Old Base Brig

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farragut Naval Base

Map Of Farragut Naval Base

 

 

 

Recruiting Labor For Base Construction

Recruiting Labor For Base Construction 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four days gave us just a taste for the area. We will definitely make a return visit.