Christmas At La Posada

Winslow, Arizona, La Posada

Celebrating Christmas At La Posada

When we began our RV lifestyle we decided that gifts for special occasions would be experiences rather than “stuff”. Continuing on with this trend for our third Christmas on the road we celebrated by having dinner at the La Posada Hotel in Winslow, Arizona, http://www.laposada.org. It was, for us, a very big splurge. Was it worth it? You bet. The hotel and the Turquoise Room restaurant are beautiful any time of the year but no better time than when decked out in holiday finery. Joining us were fellow RV volunteers, Carolyn and Ed.

Steve and I have become very interested in the story about the Harvey House Hotels, the Harvey girls and Mary Jane Colter through our studies at Petrified Forest National Park. The Painted Desert Inn, now a National Historic Landmark, was managed by the Fred Harvey Company following WWII. During the renovation, Colter, their lead architect brightened the interior, put in picture windows and had Fred Kabotie paint several murals. Very few of the Harvey House buildings remain today. You can read the Fred Harvey Story in “Appetite For America: Fred Harvey and the Business of Civilizing the Wild West- One Meal At A Time” by Stephen Fried. Who knows, maybe you’ll become a Fredhead too!

Fred Harvey, Harvey Houses

Fred Harvey

La Posada like so many historical properties went from riches to rags and was restored to its former glory. Briefly, here is the story. When Fred Harvey (1835-1901) left Liverpool, England at age 15 little could he imagine that people would still be talking about him more than one hundred years after his death. He started in the restaurant business as a dishwasher. He spent every minute learning from chefs, owners and workers. He wanted to create fine hotels and restaurants in the American West. Working with the Santa Fe Railroad he built a chain of hotels and restaurants in towns along the tracks. Known for excellent food, top drawer service and beautiful decor Harvey Houses became destinations themselves. He was one of the first employers to use women as trained servers. The Harvey Girls had to be single, have an eighth grade education, be of good moral character and commit to at least a year contract. They could not marry while employed, were known for their crisp black and white uniforms and lived in company housing with curfews. Like the hotels, being a Harvey Girl became a desired career. After Fred Harvey’s death the company was run by his sons. They expanded into working with the National Parks.

Mary Jane Colter At Work In The Grand Canyon

Mary Jane Colter At Work In The Grand Canyon

It was during this period that they employed Mary Jane Colter (1869-1958), first as an interior designer then as architect. Some of her best known work is at the Grand Canyon National Park. She designed La Posada as if it were the grand hacienda of a wealthy family of Spanish heritage. It was the jewel in the Harvey House crown. Following WWII Americans turned away from railroads as a means of travel in favor of improved roads and airplanes. La Posada closed as a hotel in 1957. The furnishings and decor items were auctioned off. The building was repurposed as office space for the railroad and a medical clinic. Fast forward to 1997 when two new owners with a vision purchased the building and sixteen acres of land. Gradually they have restored this grand hotel into a destination once again. If you find yourself traveling along I-40 be sure and stop. Watch the documentary about the restoration. Eat in the restaurant. Stay the night. Rooms are very competitively priced. Traveling with a dog? No problem. Lots of dogs bring their owners here.

Until you can enjoy this gem for yourself here are a few pictures from our visit. It was too late by the time we finished eating to go “Stand on the Corner” but yes, this is the same Winslow memorialized in the Eagles song.

Turquoise Room, restaurant

The Turquoise Room

Gift Shop

Gift Shop

Famous American Women

Famous American Women

Light, Action, Camera

Light, Action, Camera

Eat Dessert First

Eat Dessert First

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Native American Rug

Native American Rug

Spanish galleon

Spanish Galleon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year

Cheers From Us and Happy New Year

 

 

 

 

A Visit To Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary

Google Earth

Location of Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary

With four days off each week we have plenty of time to explore northeastern Arizona and western New Mexico.  Located about forty miles south between Gallup and Grants, NM in the small town of Candy Kitchen is Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary. We went there for one of the four regularly scheduled tours given Tuesday-Sunday. On this particular Sunday we were the only people on the tour which was great and made it very personal. Just know that the area is very muddy so boots are recommended.

Before continuing about our visit at Wild Spirit we’ll mention a bit of how the town of Candy Kitchen got it’s name. During Prohibition the government kept a close eye on anyone buying sugar in large quantities. To provide a cover for his bootlegging operation, a local resident started making piñon nut candy. People came to buy candy and often also something to wash it down. The area became known as the Candy Kitchen and the name stuck.

The Sanctuary began in the early 90s when artist Jacque Evans bought a ranch in Candy Kitchen. Hearing about mistreatment of wolves and wolf dogs she decided to turn the property into a rescue facility supported by selling her artwork. Gradually the facility grew and became a non-profit organization. Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary is operated solely on donations and the efforts of a very dedicated staff. They care for wolves, wolf-dogs, coyotes, dingos and foxes. Some were trapped in the wild but most were rescued from inappropriate owners or illegal breeding situations. If you read about the wolf that was found recently at the Grand Canyon, he is at Wild Spirit as well. Had they not been able to take him, he would have been euthanized. Whenever possible they keep male/female pairs together because they are very social animals. All of the animals are neutered and no breeding occurs here. The only time they have pups is if a pregnant female is rescued. Why people think they can take a wild animal and turn it into a pet is beyond us. The illegal breeding of wolves with dogs goes on despite law enforcement attempts to prevent such cruelty. The story that got to me the most was about a coyote kept on a chain in the backyard and the collar and chain cut into his skin and became imbedded. When the animal was rescued the chain had to be removed surgically.

All of the animals appeared to be well cared for by their personal caretakers. Our guide talked about the behavioral differences between wolves and dogs. The percentage of wolf to dog determines whether an animal is called a high content wolf dog or a medium content wolf dog. They usually can classify them by behavior. We stopped by one cage with a medium content animal who would alternately howl and bark. We also saw coyotes, dingos and a fox. Ever hear of a New Guinea Singing Dog? Neither had we. They look like small dingos and have a high pitched howl. At one point every animal started to howl or bark. Hearing a pack of wolves and wolf dogs is enchanting. We only wish they could be free and wild.

Taking pictures through single and double wire cages leaves a bit to be desired. The Sanctuary does offer photo tours for one or two people at a time either inside the cages of their “ambassador” animals for $50/hour/pp or in an acre size enclosure for $150/pp. We hope to return sometime for one of these opportunities. Until then here are some pictures from our visit. For more information go to their website at http://www.wildspiritwolfsanctuary.org.

wolf, Wild Spirit Sanctuary, New Mexico

Arctic Wolf

wolf dog

High Content Wolf Dog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

coyote

Coyote Pair

New Guinea Singing Dog

New Guinea Singing Dog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

red fox

Photogenic Red Fox

Food And Fun From Albuquerque To Phoenix

Following the cancellation of the farewell mass ascension due to high winds we headed to a Diners, Drive-ins and Dives restaurant called Cecilia’s Cafe in the historic district of Albuquerque. We’d recently seen this aired on the show and had planned to eat breakfast there. The burritos are HUGE! Steve had his with red chile while I chose green. The red chile was too hot for him to finish the whole thing. So be forewarned. The green chile was great and just right for me. 

Cecilia's Cafe, Albuquerque

A Great Local Eatery In Albuquerque

Diners Drive-ins and Dives

Interior View

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

burritos

I Can’t Believe I Ate The Whole Thing!

Just outside of Albuquerque is Petroglyph National Monument so we enjoyed a clear if windy afternoon there walking one of several trails with beautiful petroglyphs from the Ancestral Puebloan era (formerly referred to as Anazasi). Little did we know at that time we’d see many more wonderful petroglyphs at Petrified Forest NP.

New Mexico, Albuquerque, petroglyph

An Old Version Of Kilroy Was Here?

petroglyph

Mouse Meets Dachshund?

Folk Art Ancestral Puebloan Style

Folk Art Ancestral Puebloan Style

Then on to a quick visit at Sandia Peak. I’d taken the tram to the top of the mountain and eaten at the restaurant on a previous visit. This was the first time I’d driven up to the Visitor Center. It was a bit windy and hazy but still a lovely view. On our way home we chose, of course, another bumpy dirt road instead of the smooth paved road we took up. Still it was not as bad as Utah!

Sandia Peak, national forest

Fall Color At Sandia Peak

New Mexico, Albuquerque

On A Clear (?) Day….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tent Rocks National Monument, BLM, Cochiti Pueblo

View From Scenic Drive At Tent Rocks NM

All to soon it was our last day in the Albuquerque area and we hadn’t visited Tent Rocks National Monument only five miles away. If like us you thought all national monuments are under the National Park Service, you are wrong. Since 2000 there have been several new national monuments created. Since these lands were already managed by other federal agencies (BLM, National Forest Service or even NOAA) they remained under their control. Tent Rocks NM is on the Cochiti Pueblo lands and managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The name is derived from the rock formations created by erosion of softer sandstone under a cap of harder rock. What else can they do with rock? You’ll see. There was also a short but beautiful slot canyon we hiked through.

The Tent Rocks

The Tent Rocks

Hiking Among The Tent Rocks And Tepees

Hiking Among The Tent Rocks And Tepees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slot canyon

Entering The Slot Canyon

Beautiful Sandstone Formations

Beautiful Sandstone Formations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looks Good In Black And White Too!

Looks Good In Black And White Too!

Originally we’d planned to drive straight from Albuquerque to Phoenix but we changed plans to meet Steve’s nephew and wife who were on their way back from Sedona. We arranged to meet them in Las Cruces, NM where we stayed at Motel Walmart. This time we were the only RV there.

Our stop in Phoenix was primarily for errands, scheduled trailer maintenance and minor repairs. We stayed at McDowell Mountain County Park which was beautiful. We’d hoped to return after our volunteer job was finished in January. By the time we tried to make reservations everything near Phoenix was booked. Arizona is like Florida in the winter. Without reservations, you get what you get. So returning to Phoenix for a longer stay is on the “when we come back” list. We had gorgeous sunsets and a beautiful drive into the Superstition mountains and along the Apache Trail east of Phoenix. Phoenix is like Salt Lake City where east of the city is beautiful and west of the city is, well flat and not so pretty. However we did get to try two Diner, Drive-ins and Dives eateries. The first was a New York style deli called De Falco’s Italian Deli in Scottsdale. Steve found a sausage he loved and said he hadn’t had anything this good since leaving New York. We bought some to take home plus some gourmet goodies like jalepeno flavored avocado oil. The other place was Joe’s Farm Grill in Gilbert, Arizona. This is a working urban farm owned by the same family since the 1950s. Now it is an organic farm and the old homestead is the restaurant. It is a fast food type restaurant then you sit outside to eat. Both had great food.

With both the DreamChaser and ourselves cleaned up and stocked up we head northeast to Petrified Forest NP where we will stay until the end of January 2015.

rainbow, sunset

Arizona Rainbow

sunset, cactus, Phoenix

Sunset and Cactus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

restaurant, Phoenix, Diners Drive-ins and Dives

Joe’s Farm Grill

The People You Meet On The Road #1 – Blackwater Drifters

It’s not just the places you go but the people you meet along the way that make full time RVing such wonderful lifestyle. Very often there is a quick exchange of contact information. Sometimes you stay in touch and sometimes you don’t. Our pile of cards, brochures and “someday for the blog” info has grown continuously. A card we kept from our days at Red Rock Lakes NWR has finally worked it’s way to the top. Here’s the story…..

Only a few days after arriving at Red Rock Lakes we had just closed the office when two young men pulling kayaks loaded with gear arrived. They wanted to camp at the refuge so we directed them to the campground. One of them, Nick, asked where he could charge his phone. We invited him to use our trailer. While his phone charged we talked and listened to their plans. They were hiking/kayaking from Browers Spring (the most distant tributary and source of the Missouri River) to the Gulf of Mexico. The trip would take about 5 months. Nick had just graduated from film school and was using this opportunity to make a documentary.

Having just found his card we logged onto their website. They made it all the way! A documentary is planned for release in Spring 2015. If you’d like to read about their adventure or see some video clips go to http://www.blackwaterdrifters.com .

Up, Up and Away: The Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta 2014

Fiesta Balloon

Fiesta Balloon

Festivals are one of the activities we enjoy as we travel along in our RV. The Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta held every October is one of the largest balloon gatherings in the world. It had been on our Bucket List for a long time. Finally we were here. They do have RV sites in a field adjacent to the Fiesta but they are rather close together. If you’ve read our blog before then you know being crammed in is not our style. We chose to stay about 30 minutes north at Cochiti Lake in the electric and water loop. The park is located on land owned by the Cochiti Pueblo and the lake is a Corps of Engineers project.  It was a very easy commute to the Fiesta Park down I-25.

Keeping Track Of Steve

Keeping Track Of Steve

Coffee Now!

Coffee Now!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balloon Truck Logo

Balloon Truck Logo

 

 

Another Balloon Truck Logo

Another Balloon Truck Logo

 

Balloon Crew Humor

Balloon Crew Humor

Another Day Begins

Another Day Begins

The Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta is one of the few balloon festivals that allow spectators to mingle with participants on the field throughout the event. This allows you to watch and ask questions. We talked with pilots, crews and chase teams and learned from them. Most hot air balloons are made in Brazil. The simplest balloons cost $25,000-50,000 while the special shape balloons are well over $100,000. Each balloon team is assigned a spot on the field marked with a letter and number. The field is huge. Steve paced it off and we estimated it was four football fields wide by twelve football field long. The reason the festival is held here at this time of year is the appearance of favorable winds which allow them to fly “the box”. They generally launch and fly south at one altitude then with a blast of the burner increase altitude and fly north back to the starting area where they come back to the original altitude. Repeating this cycle allows them to stay aloft for a long time. Each balloon waits for directions from the “Zebra” overseeing their launch. These are the launch directors wearing black and white shirts. They are responsible for keeping the balloons safely separated in the air. Not an easy task when you have over 300 balloons aloft! Hot air balloons must have an inside temperature one hundred degrees higher than the outside temperature to launch. That’s one reason they fly early in the day or towards evening. The chase teams follow the balloons when they begin final decent. Pilots try not to fly too far north of the field as this could cause them to land on an Indian Reservation. Chase teams are not allowed to enter reservation property without a native guide. Waiting for a guide when a balloon does come down on a reservation can add hours to the recovery time. The entire festival is dependent on volunteers and is so well organized that you are unaware of the complexity involved.

Balloon Pilot

Balloon Pilot

The Hot Air Balloon Museum

The Hot Air Balloon Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Carnival Atmosphere

A Carnival Atmosphere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta, hot air balloon

The Dawn Patrol

A few things we learned from our first visit to the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta are:

1) Plan on attending for the entire festival as cancellations due to high winds or inclement weather mean on average 6 out of 10 events will go as planned. We came for 5 days and both evening glow and farewell mass ascension events were cancelled. Not that we need an excuse to return but when we come back….

A Favorite Of The Fiesta -  The Kissing Bees

A Favorite Of The Fiesta –
The Kissing Bees

2) If you can arrive for morning events by 5am and afternoon events by 4pm then there is ample parking ($10) at Fiesta Park. Otherwise plan on using free satellite parking and the shuttle.

Early Liftoff

Early Liftoff

3) The online ticket purchasing site is a bit confusing for first time users. We had purchased specific tickets but with hindsight if you are attending multiple events the package of 5 general admission tickets would work better. Also in the future we will plan on one event each day as there is little going on mid day.

Early Morning Play

Early Morning Play

Bubble Fun

Bubble Fun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Balloon Fiesta Museum is well worth a visit and is open year round. The festival also provides free activities for kids (of all ages), the Woodcarvers Championships, an information tent run by NASA and a variety of street performers. As we were leaving one day we stopped at a ventriloquist. He (the puppet) started talking to me. As I stepped up to have my picture taken he “jumped” and screamed as if I’d “goosed” him which, of course, made me laugh just as Steve snapped the picture!

She Did WHAT?

She Did WHAT?

4) Plan to dress in layers including hats, gloves etc. as it is quite cold both early and late in the day but warms quickly so you’ll be shedding and lugging the extra clothes. Wear comfortable shoes as you’ll be walking miles by the time you finish wandering from place to place. You won’t care though as you’ll feel like a kid in a candy store.

5) Bring your own food if possible. There are numerous food outlets but the cost is very high for what you get and in our opinion not all that great. There are tons of souvenir booths too but again we felt $35 for a T-shirt was a bit much.

Balloons Everywhere!

Balloons Everywhere!

There is no way we could give you the true experience of being here. We’ll try our best via a 16 minute video. This is one festival you need to see.

Beware Of Pirates

Beware Of Pirates

Puff The Magic Dragon

Puff The Magic Dragon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humpty Dumpty Sat On A Wall .....

Humpty Dumpty Sat On A Wall …..

 

 

Ribbitt!

Ribbitt!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now On With The Show!

Now On With The Show!

A Week In O’Keeffe Country

Sorry for the delay in posting but our Jet Pack we use for internet died and we had to get a new one. On a good note we want to say thanks again to everyone who follows us or has stumbled onto our blog. We have now hit 25,000 views! That was a goal we’d set for 2014. With your help we made it. Where will we be on the total views for 2015? You’ll have to check in and see.

We now start on our way up and down US 50 through Colorado and then turn south into New Mexico. Our last day at Curecanti was a rainy one but high in the mountains it came down as snow covering the peaks. It was magical! The DreamChaser climbed it’s highest point at Monarch Pass, reaching 11,200 feet. The decent was “interesting” as we negotiated a ten mile 7-8% grade.  At one point Steve said “The transmission temperature is getting hot. I’m going to pull over and let it cool down.” That gave us a chance to get out and snap a picture or two. I only had my iPhone which handled the contrasty situation OK but not great. We continued on without incident.

Colorado, US 50, Monarch Pass

The View At Monarch Pass

Before long we reached flatter ground. Soon we found ourselves out of the woods and into the desert. The Chama Wild and Scenic River, Santa Fe National Forest and Carson National Forest along with beautiful rock formations make the northern New Mexico landscape appealing. We arrived at our campground on Abiquiu Lake. This is a Corps of Engineers park and a beautiful place to stay. With our Interagency Pass it was also very inexpensive. In fact for the next two weeks we’d be in Corps parks and our total cost was less than $150. In the summer you have to reserve an electric site way ahead. This time of year there were still vacancies. There is a beautiful view of the Pedernal from the campground. This was Georgia O’Keeffe’s favorite mountain. She is quoted as saying “Maybe if I paint it often enough someday God will give it to me.”

Abiquiu Lake, Corps of Engineers campground,

Abiquiu Lake

Pedernal, Georgia O'Keeffe, art, New Mexico

View Of The Pedernal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 2008 before Steve came into my life, I’d visited Santa Fe with friends. We’d driven up to Abiquiu to see where Georgia O’Keeffe had lived. We learned you could tour her home through the O’Keeffe Museum but weren’t able to fit it in on that trip. I put it on the “someday” list. This week is “someday”. We choose the regular tour which costs $35 as the curator led tour for that week was already full. We were fortunate to have as our guide a retired fine arts professor who was also a painter. He said he’d been doing tours for only a month but you’d have thought he’d done it for years. He’d certainly done his homework. The tour did talk about her art but centered more on giving you insights into O’Keeffe as a person. Our guide talked about how she’d found the run down building belonging to the Catholic Church and how it took her ten years to convince the Church to sell it, the restoration and design of the home, her relationship with the community and the healthy lifestyle she followed. O’Keeffe lived to be 96. Many of the people who work on the estate today are grandsons and granddaughters of people who worked there when she was alive. Steve and I both loved the story about her relationship with her gardener. O’Keeffe collected rocks from many areas in the southwest and displayed them on her living room window sill. Of course being an artist she had them arranged aesthetically. Without ever speaking about it to each other occasionally the gardener would move a few rocks. O’Keeffe would spot the change and move them back. This went on for years. Neither of them ever acknowledged the game. Unfortunately no photos are allowed on tour. The photos used here are from the O’Keeffe Museum website.

Abiquiu O'Keeffe Home

O’Keeffe Home Living Room Looking Onto Garden

Studio Annex

Studio Annex

Courtyard Of O'Keeffe Home

Courtyard Of O’Keeffe Home

We spent time exploring the Ghost Ranch, a large workshop and conference center now owned by the Presbyterian Church. When O’Keeffe lived there it was a private ranch where she stayed and painted prior to obtaining the Abiquiu house. Today they hold self improvement, art and literature, paleontology and other workshops. They also rent rooms and cabins and have hiking trails and two museums on the property. We took a hike, visited the museums and enjoyed the gorgeous New Mexico fall weather. Toward the front of the property there is a log home. Does it look familiar? This was left on the property after being built for the set of “City Slickers”, the classic Billy Crystal movie. And yes, the sky was really that blue!

Ghost Ranch, New Mexico

Hiking At Ghost Ranch

A River Runs Through It

A River Runs Through It

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

movie prop, wagon

A Wagon From The Movies

A Tree Grows In New Mexico

A Tree Grows In New Mexico

movie, City Slickers, Billy Crystal

Cabin Used In “City Slickers”

At the suggestion of our campground host we took a drive to Echo Amphitheater in Carson National Forest and then to a monastery along Forest Road 151 in the Santa Fe National Forest. In other parts of the country these would be prominent sites. Here they compete with so many other beautiful sites that they are hidden gems. Echo Amphitheater true to its name creates a voice Echo, echo echo… The drive out FR 151 was amazing as we passed rock formations that looked like hobbit houses, the Chama River and at the end of the road the beautiful  Christ In The Desert Monastery of the Benedictine order that just celebrated fifty years in this location. Georgia O’Keeffee came here often to paint. The monastery was designed by renowned architect and woodworker George Nakashima. When I lived in the Washington, DC area I took a day trip with the Smithsonian to Nakashima’s home and workshop in Pennsylvania. The monastery uses solar power as the only source of electricity. The monastery runs the only monastic brewery in the US, the Abbey Brewing Company. In 2006 a five part television series, The Monastery, was made for TLC about five laymen living and following the monastic life for forty days. It is a place of total peace and serenity. While we were there no services were being offered but if you are lucky you might hear the monks performing Gregorian chants. Amazon offers a CD of the chants but we were not able to locate the TLC program.

New Mexico, Echo amphitheater

Inside echo Amphitheater

Rt. 151, scenic drive

The “Hobbit” Houses

Chama River, scenic drive

Chama Wild And Scenic River

church, landscape

Christ In The Desert Monastery

Monastery Gate

Monastery Gate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

church, Christ In The Desert

Inside The Monastery Chapel

Another day we headed over to Bandelier National Monument. If you can get in before 9am you can drive right to the Visitor Center.  After that you must park in the satellite lot and take a shuttle to the park. This is because the parking in the park is so limited. We got ourselves up and going. The drive up the canyon is worth the trip all by itself. We arrived just in time to take a special tour given by volunteers telling about the work the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps).  Until the CCC built the current road the monument was very difficult to access and had low visitation. We didn’t know at that time we’d be giving similar information about the CCC at Petrified Forest National Park. Following the tour we walked the trail through the cliff dwellings and posed for a picture.

Bandelier, national monument, scenic drive

Driving To Bandelier NM

Along The road To Bandelier

Along The road To Bandelier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frijoles Canyon Scene

Frijoles Canyon Scene

CCC, Civilian Conservation Corps

CCC Buildings At Bandelier

rock formations

Tree In The Rock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walking Amongst The Ruins

Walking Amongst The Ruins

Posing In A Cliff Dwelling

Posing In A Cliff Dwelling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On our way back we decided to go through Los Alamos and see the Bradbury Museum which tells the story of the Manhattan Project and current studies at the laboratory. It was strange to go through a security check point to enter a city. The museum was very interesting even though we were pushed for time.

atom bomb, Manhattan Project, Bradbury Museum

Display At Bradbury Museum About The Manhattan Project

Delivery Of The Nuclear Capsule For The Trinity Device

Delivery Of The Nuclear Capsule For The Trinity Device

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trintinite

Trintinite Formed From Heat Of Nuclear Blast

 

 

 

 

Our week went very quickly. Now we make a short move down to Albuquerque for an event we’d been anxiously anticipating for several months.