Backroad Beauty in Northern Utah

We love to drive backroads and always find the most beautiful spots. Here are a few of our favorites within the general area of Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area. We’ll identify the general areas but let the photos speak for themselves. A picture is worth a thousand words.

Just outside of the National Recreation Area but still within the Ashley National Forest is The Red Cloud Scenic Backway. This is a 65 mile loop that can be accessed from US 191 or from the town of Vernal. We drove sections of it many times and even camped there. We loved the area so much that we returned to our roots and bought tent camping gear to enjoy the free dispersed camping in at Oak Park Reservoir. Elevation ranged from entry at 7600′ to over 10,000′ at the trailhead for the High Unitas Wilderness. While not part of the Red Cloud Loop, the Little Brushy Cave is nearby and worth a stop. During high volume Spring runoff the creek pours through the cave. Steve was game to climb down while I stayed safely high and dry. Toward the Vernal end was Remember The Maine Park with paintings high on the sandstone cliff for the Maine and Pearl Harbor. Nearby were the fascinating Fremont petroglyphs of McConkie Ranch (privately owned but public invited).

Scenery Along Red Cloud Loop

Scenery Along Red Cloud Loop

The Power Of Water During Spring Runoff

The Power Of Water During Spring Runoff

Wildflowers Along Red Cloud Loop

Wildflowers Along Red Cloud Loop

Huge Columbine

Huge Columbine

Dry Fork Canyon

Dry Fork Canyon

Oak Park Reservoir

Oak Park Reservoir

Inside Little Brushy Cave

Inside Little Brushy Cave

 

 

View from Remember The Maine Park

View from Remember The Maine Park

Another of our favorite areas was Dinosaur National Monument about 40 miles east of Vernal. While most people visit the fossil quarry very few venture into the interior of the park. Now don’t get us wrong, the quarry is fascinating. We visited twice. Don’t stop there. Some roads do require 4 wheel drive. Others are paved. Below you will see Steamboat Rock. We were told that this is the site where John Wesley Powell was dangling by his left (and only) arm when a crew member dangled pants over the edge to pull him back up. He had to let go and grab the pants! Fortunately he did.

All Alone In Dinosaur NM

All Alone In Dinosaur NM

Exquisite Scenery At Dinosaur NM

Exquisite Scenery At Dinosaur NM

An Old Shepherd's Wagon At The Clew Ranch

An Old Shepherd’s Wagon At The Clew Ranch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overlooking The Yampa River

Overlooking The Yampa River

Steamboat Rock Where The Yampa And Green Rivers Meet

Steamboat Rock Where The Yampa And Green Rivers Meet

Dinosaur Logjam

Dinosaur Logjam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our favorite drive took place close to the end of our time in Utah. We set out for Indian Canyon Scenic Byway then turned onto Antelope Canyon (not the famous one near Page, AZ) Mother Nature cooperated by giving us a dry rain over the canyon for drama while not getting us wet. Then we found some great old ranch houses and abandoned farm equipment. At one old ranch there was so much rusty equipment strewn about that Steve named it El Rancho Rusto.

Indian Canyon Panorama

Indian Canyon Panorama

Rain Over Indian Canyon

Rain Over Indian Canyon

Old Indian Canyon Ranch In HDR

Old Indian Canyon Ranch In HDR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Farm Truck

Red Farm Truck

 

 

 

El Rancho Rusto

El Rancho Rusto

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rusty Green Truck

Rusty Green Truck

Still Too Long

Still Too Long

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tree Lined Pyramid

Tree Lined Pyramid

 

 

End Of Trip

End Of Trip

4 thoughts on “Backroad Beauty in Northern Utah

  1. We loved Dinasaur NP! We camped down along the river. Did you go see the ranch house at the very end that was build by a woman? She supposedly assisted Butch Cassidy. She married something like 5 times, but built and ran the ranch all by herself. There is a book about her women ancestors.

  2. Wonderful pics of marvelous places but wait…… I can’t see “my canoe”. Does this mean I need to bring mine to come see you?

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