On Our Way To Salmon, Idaho

No wonder it took so long to get this post written! We did a lot of sightseeing along the way. We had six weeks to reach Salmon, Idaho by May 12, 2017. So why did we head east instead of west?

 Stop #1: Nashville, TN. We are both self taught when it comes to Photoshop and have been wandering around the land of Youtube tutorials. Now it was time to take a course. We had given each other Jim Zuckerman’s Photoshop Workshop for Christmas. It would be a two day course held in his home in Nashville. We located a place to stay at Henry Horton State Park. A definite return to park for us. The course was excellent and we hope you will see improvement in our technique on the blog. Below is my first attempt at a composite photo where the eagle was taken from one photo, changed to B+W, resized and moved onto the winter treescape. We also learned how to take a previously edited photo and improve on it with blending modes.  Jim’s wife, Dina, dazzled us with 2 gourmet lunches and a dinner fit for royalty.

Chari Learning Photoshop

During our free time in the area we visited the Civil War site for the Battle of Stones River. Like at Gettysburg, this battle saw 1/3 of all troops killed during fighting (18,000 men). They have just added a RV site for volunteers too! We drove into Nashville to visit the Tennessee state capitol building. That makes number 5 so we have a ways to go to see all 50. The tour is free and very informative with a docent from the Tennessee State Museum. This is the only capitol building with human remains inside the walls as the architect died just before completion and is entombed there. It is the only capitol with the remains of a former president on the grounds, James K. Polk. In the picture of famous Tennesseans below how many can you name? Later we took in the Tennessee State Museum with three floors of exhibits. My favorite was the Les Paul “Old Hickory” guitar made from wood from a state record tulip poplar tree at the Hermitage which was brought down by a tornado in 1997. The finishing touch was dinner at a Nashville icon restaurant called the Loveless Cafe.

Steve has several relatives in the area and it was great to see all of them doing so well.

Andy Jackson Rides Again At The Tennessee Capitol

 

Famous Tennesseans

 

Main Floor Of The Capitol

 

Gibson “Old Hickory” Guitar

Eating At A Nashville Icon

Stop #2: Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area

Big South Fork Panorama

This large National Park Service site sprawls across the Cumberland Plateau in southeastern Kentucky and northeastern Tennessee. We stayed at the Blue Heron CG on the Kentucky side. As we drove in, the GPS wasn’t clear where we needed to turn and given a 50/50 chance we chose the wrong way. When you are towing a 40′ trailer you can’t just hang a U-turn. We had to go a ways down the road before finding a gravel parking lot to turn around. Steve did his usual great job. No problem. There was plenty of room. (Read that as he had 6″ before hitting anything.) I tried to sit there looking composed while my toes were curling in my shoes.

Appalachian Miners

Life In Appalachia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The area is named for the South Fork of the Cumberland River and begins just below Lake Cumberland. The views of the valley are stunning.There are 500 miles of hiking trails as well as scenic drives and both whitewater and calm water river paddling. Add to that two Visitor Centers, a mining museum and a scenic railroad and you have everything you need for a great nature based vacation. Did I mention the wildflowers were starting to bloom. We hiked to a waterfall and walked behind it. A few more weeks and it will be peak for them. We’d love to come back sometime for in the autumn for some spectacular foliage.

Spring Wildflowers

Butterfly Colony

A Strange Rock Formation

 

Many Steps Down To See The Waterfall

Trillium

Waterfall at Big South Fork

Stop #3: Vincennes, Indiana

Located an hour south of Terre Haute on Indiana’s western border along the Ouabache (aka Wabash) River lies the historic town of Vincennes. Founded by the French this was a hub of the fur trading era. Following the French and Indian War it became a British fort. During the American Revolution George Rogers Clark with a much smaller force overtook Fort Sackville thus making the Northwest Territory American land. Their story is one of daring and sacrifice. Had they not claimed this victory, England might still have claimed this area and the USA may not have expanded beyond the original thirteen colonies. George Rogers Clark has been eclipsed in history by his younger brother William of Lewis and Clark fame. He never received in life the money owed to him for mounting this campaign or the recognition he deserved. Today the George Rogers Clark National Historic site honors him and keeps his story alive. Be sure to read From Sea To Shining Sea that covers the lives of both Clark brothers.

George Rogers Clark, Vincennes, American Revolution

George Rogers Clark Statue at NHS

Right next door was Grouseland.  This was the home of William Henry Harrison when he was governor of Indiana Territory from 1800-1812. Vincennes was the territorial capitol. Harrison ran for President in 1840 on the slogan of “Tippecanoe and Tyler too”. The home is now owned by the DAR and our guide was very knowledgeable. Unfortunately no photos are allowed inside. We learned that his presidential campaign was the first “modern” campaign with music, slogans and gifts for donors. Too bad he died after only a short time in office. This made his vice president, Tyler the first VP to become President by succession. Later, his grandson, Benjamin Harrison would also sit in the Oval Office.

Vincennes other favorite son, comedian Red Skelton, has a museum adjacent to the Red Skelton Performing Arts Center on the campus of Vincennes University. I know I am dating myself when I say I remember sitting with my parents in our living room watching the one TV we had and laughing together over the characters Red Skelton played. Clem Kadiddlehopper was my favorite.I know some of you out there remember this too. Who was your favorite character?

Red Skelton’s Characters

We stayed at a beautifully maintained county park called Ouabache Trails. It is tucked away and we weren’t sure if our GPS (nicknamed Josie Fiend) was leading us into small roads where we couldn’t turn around. Then we saw signs for the park. Whew!

We made a quick run up to Terre Haute to see Chari’s cousin and her husband. Unfortunately he is suffering from Parkinson’s and recovering from a mild stroke. They are handling the challenges of “in sickness and in health” together. Hopefully as we write this he is back home.

Red Skelton Was Also An Artist

Stop #4: North Central Missouri

A six hour drive from Indiana brought us to the USACE Ray Behrens CG at Mark Twain Lake. We are about two hours west of St. Louis near the small town of Florida, Missouri where Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain) was born in 1835. On arrival we learned the site we’d reserved was an electric only site. We’d need to be on tank water. This seems to be a common set up in Missouri at both federal and state parks. As luck would have it there was a cancellation for a full hookup site. With our senior pass it cost us only $12/night. Hooray!

Twain Birthplace State Park

A state park preserving Mark Twain’s birthplace home offers a very well done museum of his first years as well as some artifacts from his adult life. It was interesting to find out that U. S. Grant’s first army post was in Florida. Later in life both of these men would use their literary skills to earn money to overcome financial ruin, both would write their memoirs and Twain would publish Grant’s autobiography. Steve had a book signed by Mark Twain that he donated to the Birthplace Museum before we left. About twenty miles away is the town of Hannibal where Samuel Clemens grew up and where people he knew would become characters we love such as Huck Finn, Becky Thatcher and Jim. We toured his boyhood home and a museum about his life. In town is another museum dedicated to his literary works and the original Norman Rockwell illustrations for an edition of Tom Sawyer. We bought a CD called Mark Twain in Words and Music that was created to raise funds for establishing this museum. It features celebrities like Clint Eastwood, Emmylou Harris, Jimmy Buffet and many others. We’ll be listening to it right after this entry is written. We say this is a do not miss museum.

Inside Twin’s Birthplace

Twain’s Boyhood Home In Hannibal, MO

 

She Was The Inspiration For Becky Thacther

The Mississippi River and Hannibal Are One

One place we had planned to visit was Warm Springs Ranch near Boonville, MO and home to the Budweiser Clydesdales. The ranch opened in 2008 as a breeding, recovery and retirement ranch for the horses. They started giving tours in 2009. The tours are very popular so if you have specific dates for a visit get your tickets online at least two months in advance. There is no access to the ranch other than via tour. The gates are locked until a half hour before the tour. When the horses see the cars driving in they know it is showtime and come running over to the fence to be petted. April is a great time to come as it is in the middle of foaling season. We were lucky enough to see several young Clydesdales, from one month to four months. Gestation is slightly over eleven months. At birth the foal is three and a half feet tall and weighs 125 pounds. There’s a lot of growing to do before they reach the average adult size of 2000 pounds. The tour begins at the breeding area, then on to the foaling stalls, the exercise area, the transportation trucks and finally more photo ops. All that touring can make you thirsty so yes there is free beer at the end. The horses are selected for temperment, white blaze on the face, black mane and tail, four white feet and standing six feet at the withers (shoulder). Horses that don’t meet this criteria are sold to other breeders. There are three hitches (teams) to handle all of the appearances. They are in Colorado, Missouri and New Hampshire. Each team on the road consists of ten horses, eight primary and two alternates. There are four positions a horse can be trained for; wheel (strongest), body (constant pulling), steering (holds position in turns) and lead (first to receive driver’s commands). Horses train for two years before joining a hitch. The driver’s train for six months and have to be able to handle a sustained pull of 75 pounds on their hands. The video below runs about two minutes and shows you our tour which while cool and cloudy was very enjoyable.

On the way home from Warm Springs Ranch we spotted a sign for the National Churchill Museum. Neither of us had ever heard of it. We had no plans for the next day so back south we went to Westminster, Missouri. The town is home to Westminster College and from the looks of the campus, not an inexpensive one. We were there on a Sunday and found street parking easily. That may not be the case when school is in session. The museum is housed on the ground floor of the college chapel. It was here in 1946 that Winston Churchill gave a speech and coined the phase “Iron Curtain” to describe Soviet domination of eastern Europe. For those of us who grew up in the 1950s and 60s, this phrase became a household word. The museum details Churchill’s life and well worth a visit. That’s not all! The real hidden gem was the chapel itself. Originally built in the mid 15th century it was severely damaged by the Great London fire of 1646. Architect Christopher Wren designed and rebuilt much of London following the fire including this church. Design elements such as using clear glass vs stained glass were his trademark. The church stood until destroyed by the Blitz in 1942. It lay in ruins for 20 years and was almost hauled to the scrap pile. Westminster College needed a chapel and bought the ruins. Block by block it was shipped to the USA. Skilled stone masons reassembled the ruins and restored missing sections. The only structural change was steel reinforcement for tornados. Not only do you get to visit a wonderful museum but visit a Christopher Wren church without flying to England. Put this on your “must see” list as well.

Churchill Museum Exterior

Churchill Statue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Church of St. Mary The Virgin, Aldermanbury Looking Toward The Pulpit

Wren Church Looking Toward The Organ

Our last stop was to drive to St. Charles, MO and have lunch with Lois and Steve, fellow volunteers at Hot Springs NP, who live nearby. Since we were so close to St. Louis we stopped at the Ulysses S. Grant Farm NHS. We’ve all read about Grant the Civil War general and Grant the President but here we learned of his later life and civil rights activism. We’d hoped to see the Jefferson Expansion Memorial too but the renovation and reopening of the arch was not complete. Perhaps it will be by this Fall.

Grant’s Farm

Stop #5: Iowa City, Iowa

We are still working on the long term goal of seeing every national park site. This brings us to Iowa City, the home of President Herbert Hoover and the Hoover Birthplace NHS. Before we tell you about our travels we want to warn anyone traveling in a big RV (over 30′) not to use Lake McBride State Park. The fact that they offer full hookup sites and the pad sizes are adequate would make you think it is suitable. There is nothing on Reserve America warning you of problems. We arrived and as we entered our camping loop we see a sign stating Limited Turn Around Ahead. We are able to get into the site as it is angled the right direction. Getting out, that’s another story! We couldn’t make the tight turn around and so had to go back and forth a dozen or more times to get headed the right way. We used the vacant site across from us. Had it been occupied we would have had to back down the road to where we could turn. Our experience with this and one other Iowa State Park says no more. They have not been upgraded for big rigs. OK, rant over.

Right next to the Hoover Birthplace is the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum. This is not part of the NHS but well worth the time to visit. We didn’t know that much about Hoover or his accomplishments. He is forever linked to being in office in October 1929 when the stock market crashed signaling the beginning of the Great Depression. He was a very bright and capable mining engineer and diplomat. We learned a lot and felt we had much better insight into the man and his time. By the time we left the museum to visit the Birthplace it was raining hard. Our visit was short.

Hoover As mining Engineer In China

Hoover Was The First President To Give A Speech On Radio

Hoover Served As Secretary of Commerce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Known For His Fight Against Hunger In Europe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just north of Iowa City are the Amana Colonies, several small communities founded by German immigrants as communal neighborhoods in the 1880s. There’s Amana, Middle Amana, North Amana etc. Now days they are regular towns with strong German ties and great food. Tourism is their main business and homes have been converted to shops. We certainly did our share of eating and buying wurst and pickled vegetables! The highlight for me was climbing up on the largest walnut rocker in Iowa for a photo op. Oh honey, I shrank myself!

This One’s Too Big

The other highlight in the area was eating at the Hamburg Inn #2 and trying their famous pie shake. Yup, a whole piece of pie, ice cream and milk whipped together. Steve had raspberry while I tried the chocolate bourbon pecan variety. They even have pie shake happy hour in the afternoons where you can get them at half off! Just found a website that lists the best dessert in every state. Sounds like a new goal for us is to eat one in every state!

Pie Shake At Hamburg Inn 2

Stop #6: Omaha, Nebraska

We moved on to Two Rivers State Recreation Area about 20 miles west of Omaha where we had a lovely pull through site. We came here to visit friends and fellow volunteers from Laguna Atascosa NWR, Janis and Lee. We had a great visit and got to talking so much we forgot to take a picture!

We had heard of a great museum about the Lewis and Clark Expedition during their time on the Missouri in Nebraska City. It was a bit more than an hour south but well worth the time. If you are a following the Lewis and Clark Trail or just passing through be sure to stop. It emphasizes the scientific aspects of the journey. My favorite exhibit was the keelboat with an interactive screen giving you an idea of how hard they had to work to head upstream on the river. I crashed on some rocks! So did I! My favorite exhibit was the one talking about how the native Americans caught fish. Originally this museum was built in partnership with the National Park Service but now is privately owned.

Fullsize Keelboat Replica

Chari Pacing Distance On The L&C Trail Map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taking Notes For Our Summer Job

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We took a day to visit the Henry Dorey Zoo. Lots of photo ops and great areas for the animals. We also watched two Imax movies and took the aerial skyway above the zoo. Lee drives the tram at the zoo but he was off today.

Aerial Ride

Rhino From Above

Henry Doorly Aquarium

Butterfly House

Dwarf Mongoose

Giant Plated Lizard

Jellyfish Glow

Kookabura

Penguin Curtain Call

Tarantula

Leopard

Winking Owl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stop #7: Grand Island and North Loup, Nebraska

We didn’t move too far only about 3 hours down I 80.  We came here for two reasons: first we have friends  Gayle and Bob, from North Carolina who are visiting family in the area. Nothing like a reunion with good friends when you are on the road. Secondly my cousins from Milwaukee, WI and another from NYC are coming out. None of us have ever been to the Manchester family home town of North Loup. Our first choice of places stay, Sherman Reservoir SRA, did not work out. The back in to the site dropped almost 3′ off the road. I could envision us cracking a storage tank or ripping off something. We moved on to Windmill State Recreation Area on the Platte River. The park has lovely pull -through sites. Parks along this area are in great demand during the sandhill crane migration. If I can get myself in the mood to handle the cold, I’d love to see it.

The DreamChaser 2 At Windmill SRA

We visited the Hastings Museum in Hastings, NE. This town’s claim to fame is being the home of Kool-Aid. Once again we find things from our past in a museum! Kool-Aid was first made here and marketed as Kool-Ade in 1927. By 1929 it was being sold nationwide. Then came the Great Depression. Realizing the country would be in recovery for years the price was lowered to 5 cents and remained so for 20 years. In 1934 the FDA ruled that only drinks containing fruit juice could use Ade in their name and others had to use Aid.. So Kool-Ade became Kool-Aid. We also attended a planetarium show here and viewed other exhibits. Dinner that night was at a great Italian restaurant in Grand Island.

Birthplace of Kool-Aid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kool-Aid Ad

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walkway To Hastings Museum

We met up with Chari’s cousins and drove out to North Loup. It is a small farming community with about 300 people. Popcorn is the local cash crop and the Popcorn Days Festival in August is still a major event. My grandfather was one of the founders of the festival. The family farm house no longer stands but we found where it used to be. We also located family graves in the cemetery and saw the church where my grandparents were married. Naturally, I had to buy some North Loup popocorn to take with us. For the last day in the area we visited the Stuhr Museum in Grand Island which has an extensive collection of pioneer and early settler housing from the area. On weekends they have living history volunteers in the homes to tell you about the occupants or demonstrate skills. We’d worked up a thirst and headed off to a microbrewery. They even gave us a behind the scenes tour. My cousin Kathy and her daughter Emily have done a lot of genealogical research. It is good to have a sense of where you came from and fun to see resemblances from generation to generation.

Welcome To North Loup

Church Where My Grandparents Were Married

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chari’s Grandparents

Chari’s Great Grandparents

 

 

 

 

 

Chari’s Great Grandfather

The Stuhr Museum

The Manchester Cousins In Nebraska

Stops 8 and 9: Quick Overnights in Nebraska and Wyoming

Our time was getting short so we put the pedal down and covered a lot of miles on Interstate 80 with overnights at the original Cabela’s store in Sidney, NE. They have a very moderately priced campground with full services and laundry. We needed both. We also bought a new tent and managed to spend all of our Cabela’s points. We look forward to using the tent at USFS and BLM campgrounds this summer.

Our overnight in Green River, WY brought us close to where we worked last summer at Flaming Gorge, UT. We had an uneventful night at the Walmart.

Stop #10: Massacre Rocks SP, Idaho

Our last two nights were spent at this state park in southeastern Idaho overlooking the Snake River. In preparation for our job at the Sacajawea Center we visited the Sho-Ban Museum of the Shoshone-Bannock nation. We were the only visitors there and the docent on duty spent a lot of time with us and was most knowledgeable. Then we did shopping, got haircuts and other get ready errands.

Massacre Rocks SP

So now we have only a four to five hour drive up to Salmon, Idaho and our home for the next four months. See you again when we are out and about in central Idaho.

 

 

 

 

What’ s So Hot About Hot Springs?

Hot Springs NP, Arkansas

The View From Bathhouse Row

Before we wind up falling further behind in posting than we already are, here’s a post on our time in Hot Springs. Arkansas from January-March 2017. Our first visit to this area was in 2010 before we were full time RVers. Still dazzled by the splendor of the western parks we were very unimpressed with Hot Springs and left wondering why this was a National Park. A National Historic Site or even a Monument but a National Park? We are so glad that we had the opportunity to return, spend time and learn about both the national park and the city. We really had missed the boat the first time around! So if you come here be sure and take the time to do tours and come prepared to learn. Both the park and the city have lots to offer but you can’t do it by whizzing through in a day or less. It is like an iceberg. There’s what you see above the water but when you start looking deeper there’s more and more.

A Tub In The Fordyce

Fordyce Music Room

The Quapaw Bathhouse

Us At Work In The Fordyce

 

 

Chari’s Reflection In The Hale Bathhouse Window

 

 

Monument To The First NPS Ranger Killed On Duty

 

We were working at the Fordyce Bathhouse Visitor Center, the museum and information center for Hot Springs National Park on Central Avenue in the historic district. There are 8 remaining bathhouses along what is known as Bathhouse Row in the national park and 6 of them are open to the public: the Fordyce visitor center, the Lamar gift shop and the Ozark art museum for the park, 2 operating bathhouses (the Buckstaff and the Quapaw) and the Superior microbrewery. So here’s some of what we learned and shared during our tours.

The Buckstaff, The Lamar and The Former Army-Navy Hospital (now ACTI)

Hot Springs National Park is the smallest of the 59 National Parks and the only one with a city completely within its borders. The geology of the hot springs is special because it is one of only 2 in North America not heated by volcanic activity. The rainwater takes 4,400 yrs. to travel over a mile and a half into the earth reaching 150 degrees but returns to the surface in about a year thus retaining its heat (139-143 degrees). So when you drink from the springs you are drinking water that fell as rain at the time the Egyptians were building the pyramids! That’s another big difference. Most national parks warn you to not take anything while Hot Springs NP encourages you to drink the water and take some with you by having drinking and jug fountains all around. In fact the original legislation protecting the hot springs states that the water will forever be free to the people.

Historic Hot Springs, Arkansas

 

It Is Always Spring Time In Hot Springs

 

Filling Up At The Jug Fountain

 

The Stevens Fountain

Old Hot Springs Artwork At The Ozark

The springs yield, on average, 700,000 gallons per day. Of that the park collects and distributes about 250,000 gallons. People come from hours away to fill pickup trucks full of bottles with the mineral rich water. Don’t want to drink hot water? There are two cold springs from another source as well. However, don’t expect to dip in the springs outside. They’ve been covered up for over a century to protect them from man-made and natural contamination. We occasionally had the opportunity to assist the water technicians as they tested the springs each week. The park contains the oldest land in the world ever set aside by a government to protect a natural resource. That was in 1832. If they had named it a national park back then, Hot Springs rather than Yellowstone would have been our first national park. Instead it was called Hot Springs Reservation and did not come under the NPS until 1921 as the 18th national park.

Volunteers Help With Water Testing

Recording Water Quality Data

So what is a bathhouse? In the days before modern medicine (post WWII) as we know it, people had few medications and surgery was very risky. So they depended upon the curative properties of heat, light, water, exercise and later electricity. The bathhouses were the rehabilitation facilities of the day. We told visitors that coming to Hot Springs was coming to the Mayo Clinic on one side of the street (Bathhouse Row) and Las Vegas before Las Vegas existed in the city. Hot Springs was also the primary spring training area for major league baseball before it relocated to Florida. Other sports stars like Jack Dempsey trained here. Babe Ruth hit his longest home run here (over 500′). Follow the signs on the Baseball trail to learn more.The museum is filled with interesting old equipment.The Fordyce featured the best appointed gym in Arkansas when it opened in 1915. A few items like the Hubbard tank from the 30s and the Hoyer lift from the 50s I used during my career as a physical therapist. Well, not those models but a generation later. Once again I’m seeing my life in a museum! Make sure to take the guided tour and hear some stories. When that’s done, take a hike or drive and check out the view from the observation tower. Steve was reading in preparation for our next volunteer job about some of the ways Lewis and Clark handled medical issues using Indian sweat lodges and alternate heat and cold. Equipment may change but principles stay the same.

Fordyce Gym

Indian Clubs

The Hubbard Tank Room

Chari and Steve Hiking On Hot Springs Mountain

The city is just as interesting. Gambling, bootlegging and other carnal activities were the main business. While never legal it flourished d/t payoffs to police and government official until the mid 1960s. When Winthrop Rockefeller was elected he vowed to clean up corruption and gambling. He did. Learn more at the Ganster Museum. We enjoyed the tour there and as you can see hammed it up a bit with some pics. At the same time the golden age of the bathhouse was declining. Hot Springs fell on hard times. In the late 1980s the NPS remodeled the Fordyce Bathhouse into the Visitor Center and repurposed others. This was no small task. Today you can visit the Fordyce and see the most opulent of bathhouses restored to its former beauty. Don’t miss the beautiful stained glass on three of the four floors or ride the original elevator car. Only the Buckstaff never closed its doors. Today you can experience treatment as if it were one hundred years ago at the Buckstaff or enjoy the mineral rich spring water at the Quapaw Baths spa pools. We did both and came out feeling like a piece of cooked spaghetti each time! I (Steve) had a bad cold and went to the Quapaw. Almost immediately I could feel the congestion in my chest lessening. I do believe soaking in the water cut the length of my cold in half. 

Make My Day! Steve At The Gangster Museum

This Lady Is Serious!

 

Stained Glass In The Fordyce Women’s Bath Hall

Skylight In The Music Room

Neptune’s Daughter

The architecture of the town from the 1890s-1940s is terrific and makes for some great photos. Like to shop? Only your credit card limit will dictate where and how much. Hungry? We enjoyed numerous good restaurants in Hot Springs. A few of our favorites were McClard’s for BBQ (also Bill Clinton’s), Colorado Grill for Mexican, Rolando’s for Ecuadorian, buffets at the Arlington Hotel, a Southern Living best breakfast winner Colonial Cafe and the Ohio Club where you can rub elbows with Al Capone (or at least his statue). For fun in the evening catch the monthly free performances of the Jazz Society, attend a show at the Five Star Dinner Theatre or feel like a kid at the Maxwell Blade Magic Show. Garvin Gardens was just as magical in the Spring as it had been at Christmas with a sea of tulips at peak bloom. We didn’t go to the horserace at Oaklawn but it is a big attraction from late winter through April. In summer there is the Magic Springs amusement park and all the water sports of lakes Hamilton, Catherine and Ouachita plus the Belle of Hot Springs riverboat.

Exterior Window At The Fordyce

The Arlington Hotel Lobby

 

Stairway At The Ozark

Volunteers And Ranger Touring The Archives

Ranger Leading A Guided Tour

Best Breakfast In Town

The Name Says It All

Tasting A Flight At Superior Brewery

When all is said and done it is the people from Hot Springs National Park we will remember. We made new friends with several volunteers. The Rangers were fantastic. They coached us and taught us so that we could hone our interpretive skills. They made it possible for us to visit places not open to the public such as the water distribution system, the Hale and Maurice Bathhouses and the museum archives. They thanked us for our time volunteering at least once a day. While we enjoy new experiences by volunteering at different parks or for different agencies, if we ever do repeat a job this will rank high on the list. Thank You Hot Springs National Park for a fabulous three months!

The End!

Do You Believe In Ghosts? (Part One)

old Bannock 1

Steve just found a movie we made last summer (2014) of some very photogenic barns, old buildings and other abandoned places in the midwest and west. We were on the move and perhaps out of wifi range. Just another case of out of sight, out of mind. Many of the buildings are from Bannack State Park in Montana. The state has restored this ghost town into a reflection of the once thriving village. If you ever travel through southwestern Montana, be sure to visit.

We have other ghost towns we’ve visited and on our way to Texas we’ll stop by another one. Guess we’ll need a part 2.

Heading South To Tucson

Arizona, Tucson, Saguaro NP

Saguaro National Park Panorama

With the DreamChaser back in one piece we turned south toward Tucson and prime snowbird country. While at PEFO Steve had made contact with two visitors from the Tucson area who volunteer at Saguaro National Park. We’d followed up with them and had made plans to visit. They’d give us a personal tour of the park and had even agreed to let us use their address for a mail delivery. We chose Patagonia State Park which is a bit south as closer in parks were booked. OK. I hate it when people use a blog or other social media to expound their views but I do have a complaint about Reserve America. They aren’t accurate in describing campsites. So you arrive and find (as we did here) that the 60′ site you booked is halfway down a 30 degree hill! We got into the site but keeping us on the level portion meant our slides barely missed trees, the campfire ring and a wall. Even at that we we not level. Reluctantly we closed up and headed to the nearest Walmart as the park was booked. Exiting the site we scraped going downhill and knocked our spare tire out of it’s holder. So while Steve crawled under the trailer, I cranked the holder down so he could push the tire back into place. So we spent the night uneventfully in Nogales on the US/Mexican border.

The next day we felt lucky when we  located a private park about ten miles away that had open sites. As we drove in we had our doubts but beggars can’t be choosers. We paid and drove to our site only to find our neighbor partially blocking the entrance and not home to move his car. The only other open site might have worked if it weren’t for the corner of a building sticking out just where we would be swinging wide to get in. Back to the office for a refund. Now what? We finally located an upscale RV Resort park at more than twice our normal fee. This is the type of place where people come and park for months. All blacktop, ten feet or less between rigs and very poor facilities for anyone who needs to walk a pet. We reluctantly decided to stay. While it isn’t our cup of tea we had a few good days in the area and finally met up with our hosts. Later we learned about a lovely county campground that does not take reservations and would have been a better solution. Live and learn!

Saguaro National Park consists of two sections. The second section was added when the iconic saguaro cactus in the original park were failing and it was feared they’d disappear. Then scientists discovered that the cattle grazing being allowed was the cause. Turns out the cattle were eating and/or trampling the nurse trees that young saguaro need to protect them. After the saguaro get to near full size the nurse tree (usually mesquite) dies. Ungrateful kids! After grazing was prohibited in the 1970s, the saguaro have made a wonderful comeback. We took the scenic drive and had a picnic. Along the way we learned that saguaros live to age 150 but don’t develop their iconic “arms” until after age 60. With mountains ringing the city of Tucson and the lush Sonoran desert fresh after winter rains the park put on a glorious show. While we didn’t spend as much time as we’d have liked this is a park we’ll visit again and see in more detail.

Sonoran Desert, cactus. octillo

Sonoran Desert Beauty

An Iconic Saguaro

An Iconic Saguaro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With only three days remaining in the area we packed in a lot making visits to a Titan Missile museum, Tumacacori National Historic Site and the Sonoran Desert Museum. The Titan Missile Museum is the only remaining site of this type. For those of us who grew up during the Cold War era and did Duck and Cover Drills all through elementary school it brought back memories. Entrance to the site is via tour only. Our guide was excellent and we learned a lot.

Titan Missile, Cold War

In The Control Room

Looking Down The Silo

Looking Down The Silo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tumacacori, Spanish Mission, history

Tumacacori National Historic Site

Tumacacori National Historic Site is one of the early missions established by the Spanish as they explored and settled the southwest. Here we learned that in 1736 silver was discovered nearby. Juan Bautista de Anza was sent to investigate whether the silver was a natural vein or a buried treasure. If natural the King of Spain would get 20% and if a buried treasure the entire amount would go to the Spanish treasury. During the investigation de Anza stayed at a ranch called Arizona, a Basque word meaning the Good Oak Tree. After ten years he found the silver to be natural. Due to the numerous mining documents filed here the entire area became known as Arizona. When promoters needed a name indicating great mineral wealth for a new territory they chose Arizona. Lincoln established the Arizona Territory in 1863.

Tumacacori served as a mission, a fort and a pueblo for priests, soldiers and Native Americans. The Apache migrated into the area shortly after the silver strike. The region’s wealth attracted raiding parties until Geronimo was arrested about four miles away.

Tumacacori Chapel

Tumacacori Chapel

Tumacacori As Fort

Tumacacori As Fort

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tumacacori As Pueblo

Tumacacori As Pueblo

Mission Cemetery

Mission Cemetery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On our last day in the Tucson area we went to the Sonoran Desert Museum. It was Presidents Day and very crowded. This is a botanical garden, a zoo, an aviary, an art gallery and a wildlife performance venue all wrapped up in one. A day is not enough to take it all in. We will definitely be back when hopefully we can roam freely. They do a raptor flight show twice a day. Lesson learned… get there early or be stuck fighting to see. I felt like a five year old yelling “I can’t see, I can’t see!” Sure wish Steve could have put me on his shoulders. No Way! Here are a few pictures to give you an overview.

Butterfly On Verbena

Butterfly On Verbena

Color Contrast

Color Contrast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crested Saguaro

Crested Saguaro

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Desert In Bloom

The Desert In Bloom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Name Is Boojum

My Name Is Boojum

 

 

 

Cactus Wren

Cactus Wren

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In The Hummingbird Aviary

In The Hummingbird Aviary

Cardinal Posing In Another Aviary

Cardinal Posing In Another Aviary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lizard Sunbathing

Lizard Sunbathing

Pipevine

Pipevine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raptor Flight Show

Raptor Flight Show

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owl During Flight Show

Owl During Flight Show

We’ll end with a bit of roadside humor from a bumper sticker we saw…………………..

bumper sticker humor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Week In O’Keeffe Country

Sorry for the delay in posting but our Jet Pack we use for internet died and we had to get a new one. On a good note we want to say thanks again to everyone who follows us or has stumbled onto our blog. We have now hit 25,000 views! That was a goal we’d set for 2014. With your help we made it. Where will we be on the total views for 2015? You’ll have to check in and see.

We now start on our way up and down US 50 through Colorado and then turn south into New Mexico. Our last day at Curecanti was a rainy one but high in the mountains it came down as snow covering the peaks. It was magical! The DreamChaser climbed it’s highest point at Monarch Pass, reaching 11,200 feet. The decent was “interesting” as we negotiated a ten mile 7-8% grade.  At one point Steve said “The transmission temperature is getting hot. I’m going to pull over and let it cool down.” That gave us a chance to get out and snap a picture or two. I only had my iPhone which handled the contrasty situation OK but not great. We continued on without incident.

Colorado, US 50, Monarch Pass

The View At Monarch Pass

Before long we reached flatter ground. Soon we found ourselves out of the woods and into the desert. The Chama Wild and Scenic River, Santa Fe National Forest and Carson National Forest along with beautiful rock formations make the northern New Mexico landscape appealing. We arrived at our campground on Abiquiu Lake. This is a Corps of Engineers park and a beautiful place to stay. With our Interagency Pass it was also very inexpensive. In fact for the next two weeks we’d be in Corps parks and our total cost was less than $150. In the summer you have to reserve an electric site way ahead. This time of year there were still vacancies. There is a beautiful view of the Pedernal from the campground. This was Georgia O’Keeffe’s favorite mountain. She is quoted as saying “Maybe if I paint it often enough someday God will give it to me.”

Abiquiu Lake, Corps of Engineers campground,

Abiquiu Lake

Pedernal, Georgia O'Keeffe, art, New Mexico

View Of The Pedernal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 2008 before Steve came into my life, I’d visited Santa Fe with friends. We’d driven up to Abiquiu to see where Georgia O’Keeffe had lived. We learned you could tour her home through the O’Keeffe Museum but weren’t able to fit it in on that trip. I put it on the “someday” list. This week is “someday”. We choose the regular tour which costs $35 as the curator led tour for that week was already full. We were fortunate to have as our guide a retired fine arts professor who was also a painter. He said he’d been doing tours for only a month but you’d have thought he’d done it for years. He’d certainly done his homework. The tour did talk about her art but centered more on giving you insights into O’Keeffe as a person. Our guide talked about how she’d found the run down building belonging to the Catholic Church and how it took her ten years to convince the Church to sell it, the restoration and design of the home, her relationship with the community and the healthy lifestyle she followed. O’Keeffe lived to be 96. Many of the people who work on the estate today are grandsons and granddaughters of people who worked there when she was alive. Steve and I both loved the story about her relationship with her gardener. O’Keeffe collected rocks from many areas in the southwest and displayed them on her living room window sill. Of course being an artist she had them arranged aesthetically. Without ever speaking about it to each other occasionally the gardener would move a few rocks. O’Keeffe would spot the change and move them back. This went on for years. Neither of them ever acknowledged the game. Unfortunately no photos are allowed on tour. The photos used here are from the O’Keeffe Museum website.

Abiquiu O'Keeffe Home

O’Keeffe Home Living Room Looking Onto Garden

Studio Annex

Studio Annex

Courtyard Of O'Keeffe Home

Courtyard Of O’Keeffe Home

We spent time exploring the Ghost Ranch, a large workshop and conference center now owned by the Presbyterian Church. When O’Keeffe lived there it was a private ranch where she stayed and painted prior to obtaining the Abiquiu house. Today they hold self improvement, art and literature, paleontology and other workshops. They also rent rooms and cabins and have hiking trails and two museums on the property. We took a hike, visited the museums and enjoyed the gorgeous New Mexico fall weather. Toward the front of the property there is a log home. Does it look familiar? This was left on the property after being built for the set of “City Slickers”, the classic Billy Crystal movie. And yes, the sky was really that blue!

Ghost Ranch, New Mexico

Hiking At Ghost Ranch

A River Runs Through It

A River Runs Through It

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

movie prop, wagon

A Wagon From The Movies

A Tree Grows In New Mexico

A Tree Grows In New Mexico

movie, City Slickers, Billy Crystal

Cabin Used In “City Slickers”

At the suggestion of our campground host we took a drive to Echo Amphitheater in Carson National Forest and then to a monastery along Forest Road 151 in the Santa Fe National Forest. In other parts of the country these would be prominent sites. Here they compete with so many other beautiful sites that they are hidden gems. Echo Amphitheater true to its name creates a voice Echo, echo echo… The drive out FR 151 was amazing as we passed rock formations that looked like hobbit houses, the Chama River and at the end of the road the beautiful  Christ In The Desert Monastery of the Benedictine order that just celebrated fifty years in this location. Georgia O’Keeffee came here often to paint. The monastery was designed by renowned architect and woodworker George Nakashima. When I lived in the Washington, DC area I took a day trip with the Smithsonian to Nakashima’s home and workshop in Pennsylvania. The monastery uses solar power as the only source of electricity. The monastery runs the only monastic brewery in the US, the Abbey Brewing Company. In 2006 a five part television series, The Monastery, was made for TLC about five laymen living and following the monastic life for forty days. It is a place of total peace and serenity. While we were there no services were being offered but if you are lucky you might hear the monks performing Gregorian chants. Amazon offers a CD of the chants but we were not able to locate the TLC program.

New Mexico, Echo amphitheater

Inside echo Amphitheater

Rt. 151, scenic drive

The “Hobbit” Houses

Chama River, scenic drive

Chama Wild And Scenic River

church, landscape

Christ In The Desert Monastery

Monastery Gate

Monastery Gate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

church, Christ In The Desert

Inside The Monastery Chapel

Another day we headed over to Bandelier National Monument. If you can get in before 9am you can drive right to the Visitor Center.  After that you must park in the satellite lot and take a shuttle to the park. This is because the parking in the park is so limited. We got ourselves up and going. The drive up the canyon is worth the trip all by itself. We arrived just in time to take a special tour given by volunteers telling about the work the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps).  Until the CCC built the current road the monument was very difficult to access and had low visitation. We didn’t know at that time we’d be giving similar information about the CCC at Petrified Forest National Park. Following the tour we walked the trail through the cliff dwellings and posed for a picture.

Bandelier, national monument, scenic drive

Driving To Bandelier NM

Along The road To Bandelier

Along The road To Bandelier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frijoles Canyon Scene

Frijoles Canyon Scene

CCC, Civilian Conservation Corps

CCC Buildings At Bandelier

rock formations

Tree In The Rock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walking Amongst The Ruins

Walking Amongst The Ruins

Posing In A Cliff Dwelling

Posing In A Cliff Dwelling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On our way back we decided to go through Los Alamos and see the Bradbury Museum which tells the story of the Manhattan Project and current studies at the laboratory. It was strange to go through a security check point to enter a city. The museum was very interesting even though we were pushed for time.

atom bomb, Manhattan Project, Bradbury Museum

Display At Bradbury Museum About The Manhattan Project

Delivery Of The Nuclear Capsule For The Trinity Device

Delivery Of The Nuclear Capsule For The Trinity Device

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trintinite

Trintinite Formed From Heat Of Nuclear Blast

 

 

 

 

Our week went very quickly. Now we make a short move down to Albuquerque for an event we’d been anxiously anticipating for several months.

We’re Back In Utah!

RV living, state park, Utah

Our Site At East Canyon SP

Our retirement trip in 2010 focused on visiting the five national parks in Utah. We knew then that there would be other trips out here. Now we are back for a week to visit the Salt Lake area. We are staying about a half hour east of Salt Lake City at East Canyon State Park. This is a beautiful park with a full service campground at one end of the lake and a dry camp area at the other end. At this time of year during the week there are only half a dozen RVs here but on weekends it still gets full. The drive through East Canyon was fabulous. We drove through here almost every day and we never tired of the view. Compare that to the west side where the salt flats start. What a difference. Early fall color is everywhere and the higher elevations are at peak intensity.

rock formation, lava, Utah

Devil’s Slide

One of the first things we saw fit our “What else can they do with rock?” category. Just outside East Canyon was a formation known as The Devil’s Slide where rock has been lifted almost vertically and resembles a playground slide.

We joined the weekend crowd and drove through the Wasatch National Forest and along the Alpine Scenic Byway enjoying the colors.  We went through Park City then past ski resorts and along forest roads. We kept going and the road became more and more rocky. We stopped seeing cars and noticed only ATVs and mountain bikes. When we got to the main highway we’d been trying to reach a sign for traffic coming the other way read “Road may be hazardous to cars.” Now they tell us! The scenery was gorgeous and well worth a few bumps.

autumn color, aspen

Pure Gold

 

 

 

 

 

 

national forest, fall color

Driving In The Wasatch National Forest

 

 

 

 

 

Just Playing

Just Playing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Color Everywhere!

Color Everywhere!

 

 

 

 

When we drove through Park City we stopped at the Utah Olympic Park, site of the 2002 Winter Olympics. We inquired about the advertised Bobsled Ride and made plans to go the following day. The sled is on styrofoam wheels during non-snow months and reaches speeds of 80mph and exposes you to up to 3G. Maybe God was watching out for us as it poured rain the next day. We couldn’t reschedule because at this time of year the ride is only offered on weekends. Perhaps we’ll come back some winter and do the real deal! We did return and take the tour. We highly recommend it.

bobsled ride, Olympics

Let’s Do It!

An unexpected extra was to watch the Women’s Olympic Acrobatic Ski Jump Team practice. Until snow falls they ski down a wet plastic coated surface and land in a pool. The surface of the water would be too hard a landing so as they soar over the pool an attendant in a booth at the end of the jump hits a switch. Air is forced upward breaking the surface tension and allowing them to land safely on a surface similar to snow. Then they swim to the side with their skis still on, remove the skis and climb out. They wear wet suits too. While we were on the tour someone remarked at how small the competitors were. Our guide said their motto is “Fat don’t fly”.

acrobatic ski jump

In Position

 

 

 

 

ski jump

Look Mom, No Hands!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Was That, Coach?

How Was That, Coach?

 

 

 

 

The guided tour takes you to the bottom of the ski jump where you can get a feeling for the spectators view. Where we were standing there were bleachers for 21,000 people during the Olympics. Then the van drives you to the top of the ski jump and you get a feeling for the athlete’s view. They can’t see the landing zone as they rush down and leap into the air. The landing zone has a red line marking the distance they need to reach for a “good” jump. If they go further they are awarded extra points. However the further they go the flatter the hill and the more dangerous the landing. Prior to the event the judges need to have a test jump done to determine the starting line and wind effect. A young jumper usually a 13-15 year old makes this jump. Our guide said with all the human interest stories done during the Olympics no one has ever interviewed these kids or their parents and he doesn’t know why.  While the view from the bottom was impressive, the view from the top just made you say “They’re nuts”. We also got to see the bobsled run we’d have sped down. No second thoughts for us. Our guide said it is the scariest minute of your life and a ride for those who enjoy peeing in their pants!

View From The Bottom

View From The Bottom

 

 

 

That's A Long Way Down!

That’s A Long Way Down!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View Of Bobsled Run

View Of Bobsled Run

Following the tour we went through the museum showcasing skiing legends, ski fashion and memorabilia from the 2002 Winter Games. There was an interactive ride and film you could take that gave you a feeling for the bobsled ride, a downhill ski race and an aerial ski event. You sit on a chairlift seat and it moves in response to the film. The bobsled gives you a sense of the speed and curves but not the gravitational pull. We laughed and whooped through the whole thing. We decided we are definitely coming back! We enjoyed seeing the displays of the puppets used during the Opening ceremony, photos of Olympic medalists and and hamming it up at places where you could put yourself in the picture. Lots of fun!

Skiwear Fashion Exhibit

Skiwear Fashion Exhibit

ski museum

Steve Tries The Interactive Slalom Run

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Carries The Torch

Steve Carries The Torch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Real Torch Comes Through Arches NP

The Real Torch Comes Through Arches NP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

speed skating

The Need For Speed

 

 

 

 

Pair Skating

Pair Skating

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faster Than A Speeding Bullet

Faster Than A Speeding Bullet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Downhill Racer 2002

Downhill Racer 2002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

women's ice hockey

Ice Hockey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Puma Mask From Opening Ceremony

Puma Mask From Opening Ceremony

Opening Ceremony Deer

Opening Ceremony Deer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beaver From Opening Ceremony

Beaver From Opening Ceremony

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horse Puppet

Horse Puppet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Medal From The 2014 Olympics

A Medal From The 2014 Olympics

My Tongue Is Stuck

My Tongue Is Stuck

Real Women Snowboard

Real Women Snowboard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a day of sightseeing we were really hungry so we located a Diners, Drive-ins and Dives restaurant that was close to camp called Ruth’s Diner. It has been in business since the 1930s but has long since outgrown the original diner that serves as the front of the building. We were famished and had a “soup to nuts” meal which was delicious if not cheap.

Ruth's Diner, A Salt Lake City Favorite

Ruth’s Diner, A Salt Lake City Favorite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dinner Al Fresco At Ruth's Diner

Dinner Al Fresco At Ruth’s Diner

A visit to Salt Lake City isn’t complete without a visit to Temple Square if you’ve never been there. It is the most visited place in Utah. We took a short tour which included some history of the Mormon emmigration to Utah and a visit to the chapel where the Mormon choir performs. Had we known that you could attend a rehearsal on Thursday we would have come then. We did listen to a recording and even that made me break out in goose bumps. My eyes teared. For lack of any other word, it was a heavenly sound. The acoustics are amazing. You can hear a pin drop and newspaper being torn without a microphone at 200′ away. The fabulous acoustics owe it all to the designer who was a bridge builder and had never built a building before this. The chapel roof is designed as a series of seven bridges. We decided that when we return for our bobsled adventure we will schedule it so that we can attend a performance by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

Mormon Temple

The Mormon Temple

Organ Mormon Choir Hall

Organ Mormon Choir Hall

Reflection Of The Temple

Reflection Of The Temple

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LDS Headquarters

LDS Headquarters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another stop in the area was at Golden Spike National Historic Site. This was where the rail lines of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific met and provided a means to go from coast to coast by rail for the first time. It was a huge engineering feat and the first event ever sent instantaneously around the world by telegraph. The trains on display are live steam reproductions that roll out each morning and back to the garage each evening. During the day they are kept live puffing steam to give you a sense of the moment. The actual gold spike is in the Stanford University Museum. This is the first we’ve seen of the Chinese immigration and the almost slave like conditions under which they labored. The term “Hell On Wheels” came from the bar cars, prostitutes and gambling that followed the railroad construction crews. These were sanctioned by the companies as means to keep the workers at the camps and prevent them from quitting. The museum is very interesting and has several films available for viewing. We had Opal in the truck and it was too warm to leave for long. Perhaps another time.

Dignitaries At Promontory Point May 10, 1869

Dignitaries At Promontory Point May 10, 1869

 

 

 

Railroad Workers Painting

Railroad Workers Painting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laying Rail By Assembly Line

Laying Rail By Assembly Line

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction Train 1868 At Bear River, WY

Construction Train 1868 At Bear River, WY

 

 

 

 

Photo Showing A Stir Cut At Weber Canyon, UT

Photo Showing A Stair Cut At Weber Canyon, UT

 

 

 

 

 

Replica Trains Meet

Replica Trains Meet

Our last stop in the area was Timpanogos Cave National Monument. This was our fourth cave this year and while we were a bit “caved out” it was still interesting and different from others. The Monument is really three separate caves that have been joined by man. The two distinguishing features are the Heart of Timpanogos, a drapery formation joined so it resembles a heart and the abundance of a formation called helictites. Another “feature” of the visit was the 1.5 mile walk with a 1,100 foot elevation gain to reach the entrance. There’s a reason all of the souvenirs have “I survived the walk to Timpanogos Cave” on them!

Time to pack up and head for Colorado.

Timpanagos Panorama

Timpanagos Panorama

Thumbs Up. Halfway There!

Thumbs Up. Halfway There!

Ugh! 75% Done!

Ugh! 75% Done!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wahoo!!!

Wahoo!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heart Of Timpanogos

Heart Of Timpanogos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cave Spaghetti

Cave Spaghetti

Rest Break With A View

Rest Break With A View

 

 

A Hop Over To Coeur d’Alene

Sorry for the delay in posting but our travels through Idaho, Utah and Colorado have put us in poor cell areas much of the time. When we did have good signal, it seemed we were also very busy being out and about. Hopefully we will now begin catching up. With our readers, patience is always a virtue! Thanks for sticking with us.

We hated to leave Glacier NP but after eighteen days of dry camping we were both looking forward to having hookups and long showers. On our way out we stopped in Whitefish, Montana to have the smashed side view mirror replaced. It came to just under our insurance deductible…Ka-ching! On to Coeur d’Alene in the Idaho panhandle.

Google Earth, Glacier NP, Coeur d'Alene, Farragut SP

Glacier NP to Coeur d’Alene

While we’ve been in eastern Idaho three times, neither of us had been in other parts of the state. I’d picked a state park at the southern end of Lake Coeur d’Alene called Heyburn. Reservations were made on Reserve America for a drive through site 55 feet long with water and electric. When we arrived, we had an unpleasant surprise. Yes, it was a drive through. Yes, it was long enough. However, the turn to get in was too sharp and on either side were big trees. The curve of the drive through was also too sharp for a large trailer. Steve tried to back in but there was a large rock just where he needed to put the truck so the angle of the trailer was right. If he backed in where the truck would fit, the trailer wheels were on a downhill slope. After six tries Steve said ” Let’s cancel reservations and go to Walmart.” We hadn’t filled our tank with water since we thought we’d have services plus we needed to dump. We located the dump site. Also set up with a sharp turn and narrow for a large trailer. I took a deep breath and hoped we’d make it through without any damage. We did. There was a Walmart close to where we needed to take our generators for repair the next day. We joined about ten other RVs, rented a Redbox movie and spent the night.

One good outcome of it all was finding a Diners, Drive-ins and Dives place called Capone’s. The original restaurant was in downtown Coeur d’Alene. Now there are three sites. We enjoyed our individual pizzas very much. ” I was raised in New York and haven’t found good pizza very many places. I told Chari, if we lived here, we’d eat at Capone’s a lot just like we did at Hawthorne’s our favorite pizza place in Charlotte.) “

The next day Steve ran our generators down to a Honda repair shop while Chari looked for another place to stay. We thought Farragut SP about 20 miles north sounded good but based on our experience we wanted to check it out before making reservations. First we needed to see about the slow leak we had in a trailer tire. Bad news there. The leak was a small puncture in the tire sidewall. Plus the spare tire was down to secondary rubber and by law the technician couldn’t put that on. So we bought two new tires. Ka-ching!

On to Farragut SP which is on beautiful Lake Pend Orielle (pronounced Pon Der A). We checked on availability and they had two sites left that would accommodate us. This is a lovely park with paved sites, water and electric hookups and gray water disposal drains throughout the camping loops. We were home! We’d been lucky to get a site as the coming weekend was their annual celebration for anyone who had served at Farragut Naval Training station during WWII. Prior to being a state park this area had been a major Navy basic training facility for recruits from the western states. Steve had an uncle who might have been one of the 293,000 + men who trained here. After setting up we just relaxed with a drink and dinner by a campfire.

Old Mission State Park, Idaho

Old Mission State Park

The following day we checked to see what time the generators would be ready. They’d run into some problems but thought the repairs would be completed by late that afternoon. My stack of brochures came in handy for some sightseeing ideas. We headed for another state park called Old Mission State Park which has the oldest building in Idaho. It is a National Historic Landmark. The Coeur d’Alene Indian tribe sought out Catholic priests who they heard had “powerful medicine” by sending representatives to St. Louis, Father DeSmet was the first to respond but was followed by others in the mid 1800s. The church that stands today was built by Indian labor using the wattle and daub method and did not use any nails. Features such as the handcut tin chandelier feature the creativity and artistry of the builders. Next door is a parish house furnished as it was in the early 1900s. Like many building the church went through a period of decline and was almost torn down before the state assumed ownership and two restorations were done. There is also a wonderful museum exhibit at the Visitor Center which is worth the additional $5 to view.

Front Of Old Mission

Front Of Old Mission

church, American Indian, mission

Church Interior With Handmade Chandelier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

architecture, National Historic Landmark

Ceiling Detail At Old Mission SP

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parrish House Office

Parrish House Office

 

 

 

 

Parish House Sanctuary

Parish House Sanctuary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then we took a scenic drive around Lake Coeur d’Alene and along the White Pine Scenic Byway. We looked at a National Forest Campground for future visits. A few sites are workable but Farragut SP would be our first choice. We also noted locations of some kayak pit-ins. By then it was time to pick up the generators. They were still working on them when we arrived. We talked to the mechanic as he finished up and learned of a local restaurant called The Porch which is known for its gumbo. It was late and we were hungry. Sounded good. First we had to pay for the generators…another $500! So much for paying off the credit card this month. We never would have found the restaurant on our own. Definitely one of the “locals go here” spots. The gumbo was very spicy but good. We’d come back any time we visit.

The Porch Restaurant

The Porch Restaurant

We gave ourselves an “at home” day which is something we rarely do unless the weather is bad. We had been on the go for three weeks and our energy was lagging. With our “batteries” recharged we headed to the park museum called The Brig. Normally the museum is closed after Labor Day but it was open for the veterans reunion. Within months of the Pearl Harbor attack and the USA’s entrance into WWII new bases were built quickly. One interesting fact was that Farragut was built at the same time as the San Diego Naval Base. Architectural plans were accidentally switched so that the California base was built with pitched roofs and the Idaho base was built with flat roofs. Bet the recruits had fun shoveling snow off of those roofs! The museum provides information on the home front during the war, recruitment and training and impact on the community.

museum, Idaho

Seaman Statue At The Brig Museum

Navy, WWII

Museum Is Housed In The Old Base Brig

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farragut Naval Base

Map Of Farragut Naval Base

 

 

 

Recruiting Labor For Base Construction

Recruiting Labor For Base Construction 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four days gave us just a taste for the area. We will definitely make a return visit.