Make A Plan But Don’t Plan The Results

We left Flaming Gorge NRA after a fabulous summer in early September 2016. We made a straight shot with only two quick overnight stops at Cortez, CO and Winslow, AZ for our first camp host job at Parker Canyon Lake near Patagonia, AZ. We were supposed to be there for six weeks. To make a long story short, it was nothing like the job that had been described. We decided to leave after three days.

Now what? We had lots of unplanned free time. So we headed for Roper Lake SP in Safford, Arizona (southeast part of the state) to recoup and put together a revised plan. Our only constraint was that we needed to be in Corinth, Mississippi by the first weekend of November to connect with reservations already made. Here is our revised trip plan.

Google Earth, RV, travel

2016 Fall Trip Plan Revised

Safford, Arizona is in the San Luis Valley with the Pinaleno Mountains to the west and the Dos Cabezas Mountains to the south. It is mostly a ranching and farming area. The towns of Safford, Thatcher, Benson and Wilcox form the Arizona Salsa Trail. So the first thing we did was to eat at one of the restaurants on the trail. We chose Casa Mañana as many locals were eating there. The restaurant has been on the same site for sixty years. It began when a family started serving from their own kitchen. The original home was expanded as the restaurant grew and is still the center of the restaurant. The food was so good we went back for dinner another day. When they say a huge chimichanga, believe them! We had enough left over for another meal.

Arizona Salsa Trail, Mexican food

On The Arizona Salsa Trail

Casa Mañana In Salford, Arizona

Casa Mañana In Salford, Arizona

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After catching up on errands we headed to Chirichacua National Monument. Once again we were saying “What else can they do with rock?” The scenic drive was wonderful. Of course we took many pictures.

Chirichaua NM, Arizona, geology

Balanced Rocks On Pinnacles

The Sea Captain Monolith

The Sea Captain Monolith

Scenic Drive At Chirichacua NM

Scenic Drive At Chirichacua NM

Steve At The Overlook

Steve At The Overlook

 

Another day we joined the tourist ranks and headed over to Tombstone for the Second Annual Territory Days Celebration. Yes we saw the OK Corral but declined to pay $8 for their daily gunfight. We enjoyed the parade through town and the Folklorico dancers. We did spend time in an oil and vinegar store where we purchased some tangerine balsamic and a tasty BBQ sauce.

Territorial Days Parade

Territorial Days Parade

Hickcock We Presume?

Hickcock We Presume?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buffalo Soldiers

Buffalo Soldiers

Hanging Out In Tombstone

Hanging Out In Tombstone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horsepower

Horsepower

Local No Kill Shelter "Cowboy"

Local No Kill Shelter “Cowboy”

And You Think You Had A Crappy Job?

And You Think You Had A Crappy Job?

Folklorico Dancers Performing

Folklorico Dancers Performing

Dancer In Motion

Dancer In Motion

Portrait Of A Dancer

Portrait Of A Dancer

The real surprise in the area was a drive into the Pinaleno Mountains along the Swift Trail. In only 35 miles you climb over 5,000 feet. The temperature when we started was ninety-two but at the top only a breezy fifty-one. Great tent camping here but only space for truck campers and popups around a lake. We stopped at a family run orchard and bought some apples which became apple pie and applesauce. They told us to feel free to pick some for eating then. We did! It’s been a long time since I’ve had an apple this juicy. For such a short distance we were surprised when it took us two and a half hours to get to the top. A nice change from the heat of the valley. There’s quite a bit more to do in this area and so we say “when we come back…”

A View From Swift Trail

A View From Swift Trail

apple-of-my-eye-72

He’s The Apple Of My Eye

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lake At The Top Of Swift Trail

Lake At The Top Of Swift Trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

For When We Come Back

For When We Come Back

Backroad Beauty in Northern Utah

We love to drive backroads and always find the most beautiful spots. Here are a few of our favorites within the general area of Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area. We’ll identify the general areas but let the photos speak for themselves. A picture is worth a thousand words.

Just outside of the National Recreation Area but still within the Ashley National Forest is The Red Cloud Scenic Backway. This is a 65 mile loop that can be accessed from US 191 or from the town of Vernal. We drove sections of it many times and even camped there. We loved the area so much that we returned to our roots and bought tent camping gear to enjoy the free dispersed camping in at Oak Park Reservoir. Elevation ranged from entry at 7600′ to over 10,000′ at the trailhead for the High Unitas Wilderness. While not part of the Red Cloud Loop, the Little Brushy Cave is nearby and worth a stop. During high volume Spring runoff the creek pours through the cave. Steve was game to climb down while I stayed safely high and dry. Toward the Vernal end was Remember The Maine Park with paintings high on the sandstone cliff for the Maine and Pearl Harbor. Nearby were the fascinating Fremont petroglyphs of McConkie Ranch (privately owned but public invited).

Scenery Along Red Cloud Loop

Scenery Along Red Cloud Loop

The Power Of Water During Spring Runoff

The Power Of Water During Spring Runoff

Wildflowers Along Red Cloud Loop

Wildflowers Along Red Cloud Loop

Huge Columbine

Huge Columbine

Dry Fork Canyon

Dry Fork Canyon

Oak Park Reservoir

Oak Park Reservoir

Inside Little Brushy Cave

Inside Little Brushy Cave

 

 

View from Remember The Maine Park

View from Remember The Maine Park

Another of our favorite areas was Dinosaur National Monument about 40 miles east of Vernal. While most people visit the fossil quarry very few venture into the interior of the park. Now don’t get us wrong, the quarry is fascinating. We visited twice. Don’t stop there. Some roads do require 4 wheel drive. Others are paved. Below you will see Steamboat Rock. We were told that this is the site where John Wesley Powell was dangling by his left (and only) arm when a crew member dangled pants over the edge to pull him back up. He had to let go and grab the pants! Fortunately he did.

All Alone In Dinosaur NM

All Alone In Dinosaur NM

Exquisite Scenery At Dinosaur NM

Exquisite Scenery At Dinosaur NM

An Old Shepherd's Wagon At The Clew Ranch

An Old Shepherd’s Wagon At The Clew Ranch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overlooking The Yampa River

Overlooking The Yampa River

Steamboat Rock Where The Yampa And Green Rivers Meet

Steamboat Rock Where The Yampa And Green Rivers Meet

Dinosaur Logjam

Dinosaur Logjam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our favorite drive took place close to the end of our time in Utah. We set out for Indian Canyon Scenic Byway then turned onto Antelope Canyon (not the famous one near Page, AZ) Mother Nature cooperated by giving us a dry rain over the canyon for drama while not getting us wet. Then we found some great old ranch houses and abandoned farm equipment. At one old ranch there was so much rusty equipment strewn about that Steve named it El Rancho Rusto.

Indian Canyon Panorama

Indian Canyon Panorama

Rain Over Indian Canyon

Rain Over Indian Canyon

Old Indian Canyon Ranch In HDR

Old Indian Canyon Ranch In HDR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Farm Truck

Red Farm Truck

 

 

 

El Rancho Rusto

El Rancho Rusto

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rusty Green Truck

Rusty Green Truck

Still Too Long

Still Too Long

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tree Lined Pyramid

Tree Lined Pyramid

 

 

End Of Trip

End Of Trip

Where Next? #10

It’s hard to believe that our wonderful summer in northern Utah is coming to a close. So where will the four winds blow us next?

First we are headed over to Laramie, Wyoming to visit friends who are volunteering at the Wyoming Territorial Prison State Historical Site. Then south to the Silverton/Durango area in Colorado. A brief stop at Petrified Forest NP to say hi to staff where we volunteered in 2014-2015. Lastly we turn south to try our hand at being camp hosts for the Coronado National Forest at Parker Canyon Lake about an hour south of Tucson, AZ. After 6 weeks there we make an almost straight through drive to Charlotte, NC. We know now that full timing is what we want so no use paying to store things for 15+ years. We’ll pare down to just a few memory pieces.

Then a much overdue trip to see Steve’s family in Chambersburg, PA for Thanksgiving. From there we meander for a month via Alabama, Florida and Louisiana to our next volunteer job at Hot Springs National Park in Hot Springs, Arkansas. We’ll be there from January-March 2017.

Our path this time looks a lot like a ricocheting bullet, doesn’t it? Thanks for traveling with us!

RV Travels From Flaming Gorge NRA, UT to Hot Springs NP, AR

RV Travels From Flaming Gorge NRA, UT to Hot Springs NP, AR

Top Campgrounds for July 2015 – July 2016

Would we have enough campgrounds to keep posting this year? We lived “free” for 8 months while volunteering. Yes, we actually had 15 candidates. Since we are not using our Verizon phones in northern Utah we almost forgot about posting our top campground stays for this past year. The iPhone battery was dead so after charging I got into notes and here are the results:

campgrounds, blog, RV

Top 10 CG 7/2015-7/2016

Hall of Fame (campgrounds we returned to and still find terrific):

Cochiti CG, NM – USACE facility

These are not in order of preference but simply represent the order in which we stayed.

1. Mossyrock CG, WA – utility run facility near Mt. St. Helens with W/E

2.  Prineville Reservoir SP, OR – state park on lake with W/E

3. Palo Duro Canyon SP, TX – state park near Amarillo with W/E

4. Lavon Lake, TX – USACE park near Dallas with W/E

5. Alley Creek Park, TX – USACE park at Lake Of the Pines with W/E

6. Cagle Recreation Area, TX – USFS park near Houston with FHU

7. Cranes Mill at Canyon Lake, TX – USACE park in the Hill country with W/E

8. Seminole Canyon SP, TX – state park near Del Rio with W/E

9. Hueco Tanks SP, TX – state park near El Paso with W/E

10. James M. Robb Colorado River SP (Fruita section), CO – state park near Grand Junction with FHU

You Can’t Brand A Wet Calf

ranch, cattle

Waiting For The Cattle

Shortly after starting work at Flaming Gorge NRA a brochure circulated announcing the 6th annual calf branding exhibition at historic Swett Ranch. Sweet Ranch is located in the Ashley National Forest and is open for both self guided and docent tours. The Swett family homesteaded in the Uinta Basin from 1909-1970. Many of their descendants still live in the Vernal, Utah area. Three generations graze cattle on National Forest land each summer. In order to graze cattle in Ashley NF they must be branded and the brand registered with the state of Utah. The flyer said in case of rain the event would be cancelled as “The cowboys won’t melt but you can’t brand a wet calf.”

roundup, cattle,

Round ‘Em Up

We were working that day but two of the other volunteers who had been here before took a few extra hours so we could attend the branding. Thanks Judy and Fred! The branding took about 2 hours. Teams of two first roped the calf, a third got it on the side and tied the feet and the fourth did the branding. Two women gave injections. If the calf was a bull, he became a steer.  The only part that bothered me was the smell of hair burning and yes, skin too. The smell stayed in my nostrils for a couple of hours. We noted some cows could have cared less when they were separated from their calves while others followed closely and checked their offspring thoroughly upon release.

roping calf, cowboy, branding

Roping The Calf

Teamwork

Teamwork

This Won't Hurt

This Won’t Hurt

Branding Time

Branding Time

cow, calf, ranch

A Concerned Mother

 

Our favorite part was watching the youngsters “help” while dressed in their best western wear. One four year old had a swagger and strut that made us laugh.

The Next Generation

The Next Generation

child, Utah, ranch

Cowboy With Attitude

Another day we hiked the 2.5 miles from Greendale Overlook to Swett Ranch enjoying scenery and wildflowers along the way. Fellow volunteers George and Diane gave us an in depth tour. Oscar Swett built the first one room cabin in 1909. He married Emma and they raised 16 children here. A two room cabin and the ranch home were built to accommodate  their growing family. Oscar farmed and ranched here. He was very thrifty and repurposed many things such as the 1917 Hudson windshield used as a workshop window. Here are a few pictures from the historic homestead.

Three Swett Homes

Three Swett Homes

Horse Barn

Cow Barn

Laundry On The Porch

Laundry On The Porch

 

Starting Our Summer At Flaming Gorge NRA

Canyon, Flaming Gorge

Firehole Canyon On Wyoming Side Of Flaming Gorge

We drove from Fuita, Colorado to the Ashley National Forest in northeastern Utah where we will be volunteering at Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area. The drive through the mountains just north of Fruita was beautiful as was the drive from Moab through Vernal. Much of this route is part of the Dinasaur Diamond National Scenic Byway. We reached a maximum height of 8500 feet. We are planning a third trip to Fruita as there is still much to explore.

In Vernal we headed north on US 191 also known as the Uintas-Flaming Gorge Scenic Byway. If we hadn’t been pulling the trailer we’d have pulled over at the many overlooks and interpretive signs detailing the geology of the area. The area is known for its geology and paleontology. Dinosaur National Monument is only an hour and a half away and Vernal has a museum that’s part of University of Utah’s paleontology collection. As you drive north you pass from the youngest geological layers to the oldest ones at a billion years old. There are 10 switchbacks and several 5-8% grades but we had no trouble even with the new 40’ rig.

Red Canyon, Flaming Gorge, Ashley National Forest

Red Canyon From The Rim Trail

We arrived at the Red Canyon Complex where 15 RV volunteers will be housed in RVs and a duplex. We settled in. The volunteers work in different areas of the forest from fee collection/boat ramp management, the historic Swett Ranch and the Red Canyon Visitor Center. The USFS provides us with an RV site and full hookups, uniforms including pants and reimbursement for propane and mileage. We are even being given 350 miles to explore the area so we can talk knowledgeably to visitors.

Steve At Dowd Mountain Overlook

Steve At Dowd Mountain Overlook

Uinta mountains, landscape

Snow Capped High Uintas Wildness

As if that’s not enough they provide a day on the river at Volunteer Appreciation Day. Our days off will be spent driving scenic back roads, hiking, paddling/rafting and fishing. Besides the reservoir there are some 600 lakes in the Uintas (pronounced U – win – taz) although only a few are accessible by car. There are numerous campgrounds and lots of dispersed camping in these, Utah’s highest and oldest mountains. Last winter was the snowiest one on record in 25 years so the High Uinta Wilderness with peaks to 13,000 feet still have four feet of snow. In anticipation of the melting snow the dam began releasing water from the reservoir to the Green River at 6600-8600 cu. ft./sec. for 24 hours a day for at least two weeks. A float trip on section A of the river that normally takes 2.5 hours now takes just 45 minutes. Quite a show.

Flaming Gorge Dam Releasing Water

Flaming Gorge Dam Releasing Water

Green River Below The Dam

Green River Below The Dam

 

 

 

So far we have walked a portion of the Canyon Rim Trail, climbed the historic Ute Fire Tower (just reopened after being closed for 8 years), visited Dowd Mountain Overlook, driven Sheep Creek Geological Loop and the Red Cloud Scenic Backway, toured Flaming Gorge Dam, visited the Utah Natural History Field House, observed a cattle branding at Swett Ranch and put the kayaks in the water once. Is it any wonder we’re behind in posting? Weather for our first 2 weeks was cool and rainy. Now temperatures have warmed up with sunny days but pleasantly cool nights. This is going to be a fabulous summer.

wildlife, pronghorn

Pronghorn In Aptly Named Antelope Canyon

Bighorn sheep

Rams Rest Under A Tree At The Volunteer village

 

 

Four More Years! Four More Years!

With this being an election year this title seemed appropriate. Truth is we want many more than four more years on the road! As we roll into Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area for our summer 2016 volunteer assignment we celebrate our fourth anniversary as fulltime RVers. We left our sticks and bricks home in Charlotte, NC on May 17, 2012. Since then we have travelled 120,000 miles and stayed in over 110 campgrounds. On the Google Earth picture below Yellow = year 1, Red = year 2, Black = year 3 and Green= year 4. We continue to be amazed by the beauty of our country and our neighbor to the north, Canada. Hidden gems we never knew existed surprise us. Roadside humor finds us smiling and often laughing out loud. We love our carefree vagabond life!

travel, RV, full time, USA

Four Years On The Road

We decided to celebrate two days early as the weather for the 16th was predicting rain. When we were in the Grand Junction, CO area in 2010 with our first RV (before being full time) we “discovered” a beautiful spot called Rabbit Valley in the Mc Innis Canyon National Conservation Area. An eight mile dirt road leads to a turn off for Salt Creek Overlook. You are greeted by a splendid view and a picnic table. We have been planning a return ever since armed with a loaf of bread, cheese and wine. We pictured a calm sunset. Funny how what you plan and what happens isn’t always the same. We arrived to find a wind of 20-25 mph blowing. Even the bread was getting blown off the plate. As I went to drink from my glass of wine the wind caused a tsunami in my glass! Wine blew all over my face and shirt. No smiling wine drinking picture this time! All we could do is laugh. The up side of coming in the Spring was that the valley was full of wildflowers: orange globe mallow, white fleabane and thistle, pink mariposa lilies, blue and yellow flowers yet to be identified and three types of cactus in bloom. As sunset approached the wind calmed and we took a walk to the point overlooking a horseshoe bend in the Colorado River. A great day after all.

Colorado, wildflowers, McInnis Canyon

Rabbit Valley in Bloom

Salt Creek Overlook

Salt Creek Overlook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildflowers Of Mc Innis canyon

Wildflowers Of Mc Innis canyon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opal Enjoyed The View Too

Opal Enjoyed The View Too

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Of a Photographer

Photo Of a Photographer

Wildflowers Around A Stump

Wildflowers Around A Stump

Cactus In Bloom

Cactus In Bloom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Great Day!

A Great Day!